0
Spring 2001

Four New Distinguished Professors Appointed

 

 

t its January meeting, CUNY's Board of Trustees increased the ranks of Distinguished Professors by four, naming computer scientist Robert M. Haralick, geographer David Harvey, novelist and editor Elizabeth Nunez, and historian Mike Wallace to the University's highest academic rank.

Geographer David Harvey
Geographer David Harvey

Welcoming the appointments, Chancellor Matthew Goldstein observed, "David Harvey's appointment confirms CUNY's Ph.D. Program in Anthropology as the premiere destination for the anthropological study of global urban issues. The Distinguished Professorships also recognize the unique contributions in scholarship and teaching that Mike Wallace and Elizabeth Nunez have made to the University, and Robert Haralick's record of influential research is a formidable asset to our invigorated Ph.D. Program in Computer Science." Harvey, who earned all of his degrees at Cambridge University in England, is the author of several milestones in his field, notably Explanation in Geography, Social Justice and the City, Limits of Capital, The Condition of Postmodernity, and, most recently, Nature and the Geography of Difference.

Computer Scientist Robert M. Haralick
Computer Scientist Robert M. Haralick

His work has been called "the single most important, influential, and imaginative contribution to the development of human geography since World War II." Haralick came to the Graduate Center in September with an international reputation in the areas of computer pattern recognition, vision, document analysis, and artificial intelligence. Haralick, who formerly held an endowed chair and taught for 14 years at the University of Washington, has published more than 500 papers and is the author, co-author, or editor of nine books, among these his recent Mathematical Morphology: Theories and Applications.

Author Elizabeth Nunez
Author Elizabeth Nunez

A teacher at Medgar Evers College since 1972, Nunez enjoys worldwide recognition for her fiction and other writings illuminating the African-Caribbean and African-American experience. Known not only for three novels (When Rocks Dance, Beyond the Limbo of Silence, and Bruised Hibiscus), the award-winning teacher also founded the National Black Writers Conference at Medgar Evers in 1986. Since then she has directed five of the conferences and raised more than $10 million for them and other educational programs in Brooklyn.

Historian Mike Wallace
Historian Mike Wallace

Widely celebrated at CUNY in 1999 was Wallace's winning of the Pulitzer Prize (along with Brooklyn College professor Edwin Burrows) for Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. A passionate exponent of "public history," a field he helped to invent, Wallace is refusing to rest on his laurels and is now forging ahead on the second volume of Gotham, which will cover the 20th century. An historian with three Columbia University degrees, Wallace has served as a consultant to several metropolitan museums (and to Ric Burns on his recent TV documentary), founded and directed the NYC History Project, and is the founder and inaugural director of the Gotham Project for NYC History at the Graduate Center.