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February 2002
CUNY Responds: Rebuilding New York
CUNY Alumnus/Prize-winning Journalist Reports from Islamabad, Jalalabad, Kabul
City Tech Students Envision Rebuilding St. Nicholas Church
U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins Mulls Emergency Service of Verse
John Jay College and FEMA Address Urban Hazards
Helping Students Write about Trauma
Biography of a Life Cut Violently Short
CUNY Law Practice In the Public Interest Since 9/11
Graduate Center 9/11 Digital Archive
Windows on the World Chef Returns to City Tech following 9/11
Walt Whitman Sums Up “Human and Heroic New York”
Inaugural Conference on "Women and Work"
For Alzheimer’s Patients Life’s a Stage
Kingsborough Center Incubator of Global Virtual Enterprises
Governor Proposes State Budget
White House Urged to Support Pell Grant Increase
President Jackson Named to Schools Board
Fine Way To Learn About Steinway

City College Scholar-Director Chosen Cultural Affairs Commissioner by Mayor

Claire Shulman Honored by QCC

CUNY Counsel Elected Legal Aid Society Chair

Law Dean Glen Honored by State Bar

“American Art at the Crossroads”—
April Symposium at Graduate Center

Challenging Summer for Students in Vassar/CUNY Program

 
 

CUNY Counsel Elected Legal Aid Society Chair

Frederick P. SchafferFrederick P. Schaffer, the University's General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs, was elected Chairman of the 125-year-old Legal Aid Society of New York in January. He will serve a two-year term in the voluntary position.

Schaffer—who arrived at CUNY in June 2000 after serving as a litigator for New York City's Corporation Counsel and an as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Southern District of New York—will be leading the nation's oldest and largest legal services organization.

The Society is also the largest legal employer in the metropolitan area, with a $125 million annual budget and 900 attorneys on staff who typically deal with 300,000 cases a year. Its clients include homeless families, welfare recipients, foster children, the elderly poor, and Rikers Island inmates and other prisoners.