Academic News

Pathways for CUNY’s Largest Transfer Majors

August 6, 2012 | Featured

Dear Colleagues,

You will recall that the CUNY Board of Trustees June 2011 resolution contained the following paragraph concerning majors:

Resolved, that clear pathways be created for the largest transfer majors. The Chancellor, in consultation with the Council of Presidents, the University Faculty Senate, and the University Student Senate, will convene relevant disciplinary committees consisting predominantly of faculty. By May 1, 2012, each such disciplinary committee will recommend for approval to the University Office of Academic Affairs no fewer than three and no more than six courses that will be accepted as entry-level courses for beginning the major, or as prerequisites for such courses, by all colleges offering those majors, and by Fall 2013 these courses must be offered and their status as major-entry courses widely publicized at each college offering the major.

In accordance with this resolution, and consistent with the recommendations of the relevant faculty committees (please see http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/academic-news/2012/03/19/pathways-transfer-major-committees-release-draft-recommendations-invite-comment/), as chaired by William Kelly, President of the Graduate Center, the Office of Academic Affairs has approved the courses and learning outcomes for students in these majors:  Criminal Justice, English, Nursing, Psychology, and Teacher Education (please see the relevant section below for details concerning each of these majors).  Work is in progress on the majors in Biology, Business, Economics, Engineering, Political Science, and Sociology.

Therefore, by the Fall 2013 semester, each college offering one of the majors below should be offering for credit each of the courses indicated below, and should be giving students who have satisfactorily completed those courses credit towards the indicated major (or, in some cases, giving credit for courses leading into the indicated major), whether those students are native to that college or have transferred in after having taken one or more of those courses at another CUNY college.  Further, the status of each of these courses as major-entry courses should be widely publicized at each college offering that major.

Thank you for your help in ensuring that these courses are available to our students, and that our students receive appropriate credit for taking them.  If you have any questions or concerns about any of this, please contact Associate University Provost Julia Wrigley (julia.wrigley@mail.cuny.edu, 212-794-5658).

Sincerely,

Alexandra W. Logue
Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost

MAJORS, COURSES, AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

Criminal Justice

Introduction to Law Enforcement
1. Explain the role of the police in the administration of justice in the United States of America

  • a. Identify specific periods related to the origins of U.S. police and their development.
  • b. State the interrelated functions of modern U.S. police with courts and corrections.

2. Analyze the theories related to the policy and practice of police

  • a. Describe how specific theories of crime control affect the police (i.e., routine activities, deterrence, environmental criminology).
  • b. Given a fact pattern, identify what crime control approach to employ.

3. Analyze the operations and administration of police

  • a. Categorize and differentiate the primary elements of police operations and administration in various police agencies.

4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing and synthesizing evidence to evaluate arguments and draw inferences

  • a. Actively conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate information from class lectures and exposure to written works in research papers, presentations and exams.
  • b. Use the aforementioned skills as a guide to belief and action when presented with given fact pattern by reciting, writing responses or presenting perspectives during exams, research projects and presentations.

5. Demonstrate the ability to access, conduct, interpret and apply police research within the context of public discourse

  • a. Deliver or recite information about a specific topic through class-led discussion, research papers and presentations.

6. Demonstrate proper writing skills

  • a. Through written homework, assigned writing projects, and exams, apply the principles and techniques of democratic policing.

Introduction to Criminal Justice
1. Performance objectives:

  • a. Students will develop analytical, ethical and critical reasoning skills through writing assignments and participation in class discussions.
  • b. Students will develop the ability to effectively locate information.
  • c. Students will develop the ability to integrate and contrast information from different sources and to present this information in writing in a clear, coherent and systematic way.

2. Knowledge objectives:

  • a. Students will gain an understanding of the American criminal justice system with a view to its social and institutional context, and its structure and functioning. This includes an understanding of the importance of issues of diversity embedded in the field of criminal justice.
  • b. Students will gain an understanding of why societies punish certain behavior in the first place, how the law distinguishes between lawful and unlawful behavior, and what legal safeguards have been established in democratic societies against unfair and unreasonable punishment.
  • c. Students will gain an understanding of how and why crimes are committed, and what this means for individual victims and for society.
  • d. Students will gain an understanding of the sequence of events that leads to the determination of guilt or innocence of an individual alleged to have committed a crime. Students will also learn about the various criminal justice institutions, including police, courts and corrections, and how they interact at the various stages of the criminal justice process.
  • e. Students will gain an understanding of why and how offenders are punished, and what the individual and social consequences of punishment are.

Criminology
1. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the core literature and debates that make up the discipline of criminology.

  • a. Show evidence of having read and understood the core literature and debates presented on the course, specifically those related to the socially constructed nature of crime and deviance, measurement, causes and key aspects of crime control policy.

2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the key components of criminological theory and the ability to apply theory to specific contexts.

  • a. Be familiar with the main thinkers and leading classical and contemporary theories of crime causation.
  • b. Show an understanding of how theory relates to definitions of crime, criminal behavior and policy.

3. Students will demonstrate the ability to make reasoned and informed judgment on issues relating to crime and punishment

  • a. Show the ability to question conventional wisdom about crime and punishment.
  • b. Show the ability to put debates on crime and punishment and policies relating to the control of crime in their wider social, historical, political and economic context.

English

English Composition
A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will:

  • a. Read and listen critically and analytically, including identifying an argument’s major assumptions and assertions and evaluating its supporting evidence.
  • b. Write clearly and coherently in varied, academic formats (such as formal essays, research papers, and reports) using standard English and appropriate technology to critique and improve one’s own and others’ texts.
  • c. Demonstrate research skills using appropriate technology, including gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources.
  • d. Support a thesis with well-reasoned arguments, and communicate persuasively across a variety of contexts, purposes, audiences, and media.
  • e. Formulate original ideas and relate them to the ideas of others by employing the conventions of ethical attribution and citation.

Note:  These learning objectives are identical to those for English Composition in the Common Core (see http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/academic-news/files/2011/12/CommonCoreStructureFinalRec.pdf).

Introduction to Literature
A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will:

  • a. Be able to respond proficiently in writing (i.e. per the outcomes for “A”) to literary works.
  • b. Display familiarity with literary works by a variety of authors in a variety of genres.
  • c. Be able to offer an extended discussion in writing of two or more texts and authors in relation to each other.
  • d. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret based on careful attention both to the detail and overall design of a literary work.
  • e. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of context in determining meaning.

Introduction to Literary Studies
A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will:

  • a. Display a working knowledge of basic terms and concepts used in the analysis of a variety of literary genres.
  • b. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works relate to their immediate historical context and to the traditions from which they emerge.
  • c. Be able to undertake the close reading of a literary work, with particular emphasis on the relationship between parts and wholes and between form and meaning.
  • d. Be able to construct a literary argument using secondary sources (in particular discipline-specific databases and archives) and employing MLA style.
  • e. Engage in written reflection on the critical assumptions that inform their own and others’ interpretations of literary works.

Nursing

English Composition
A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will:

  • a. Read and listen critically and analytically, including identifying an argument’s major assumptions and assertions and evaluating its supporting evidence.
  • b. Write clearly and coherently in varied, academic formats (such as formal essays, research papers, and reports) using standard English and appropriate technology to critique and improve one’s own and others’ texts.
  • c. Demonstrate research skills using appropriate technology, including gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources.
  • d. Support a thesis with well-reasoned arguments, and communicate persuasively across a variety of contexts, purposes, audiences, and media.
  • e. Formulate original ideas and relate them to the ideas of others by employing the conventions of ethical attribution and citation.

Note:  These learning objectives are identical to those for English Composition in the Common Core (see http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/academic-news/files/2011/12/CommonCoreStructureFinalRec.pdf).

Anatomy and Physiology I
After taking this course a student will:

  • a. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a life or physical science.
  • b. Apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including hypothesis development, observation, experimentation, measurement, data analysis, and data presentation.
  • c. Use the tools of a scientific discipline to carry out collaborative laboratory investigations.
  • d. Gather, analyze, and interpret data and present it in an effective written laboratory or fieldwork report.
  • e. Identify and apply research ethics and unbiased assessment in gathering and reporting scientific data.
  • f. Understand and describe the basic physiological principles of cells and tissue, and muscular, skeletal, immune, and nervous systems.
  • g. Understand, identify, and describe the basic anatomical structures associated with cells and tissue, and muscular, skeletal, immune, and nervous systems.
  • h. Develop basic dissection and laboratory techniques relevant to the field of anatomy and physiology.

Anatomy and Physiology II
After taking this course a student will:

  • a. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a life or physical science.
  • b. Apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including hypothesis development, observation, experimentation, measurement, data analysis, and data presentation.
  • c. Use the tools of a scientific discipline to carry out collaborative laboratory investigations.
  • d. Gather, analyze, and interpret data and present it in an effective written laboratory or fieldwork report.
  • e. Identify and apply research ethics and unbiased assessment in gathering and reporting scientific data.
  • f. Understand and describe the basic physiological principles of circulatory/cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, digestive, lymphatic and integumentary systems.
  • g. Understand, identify, and describe the basic anatomical structures associated with the circulatory/cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, digestive, lymphatic and integumentary systems.
  • h. Develop basic dissection and laboratory techniques relevant to the field of anatomy and physiology.

Mathematics (Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning)
A course in this area must meet all of the following learning outcomes. A student will:

  • a. Interpret and draw appropriate inferences from quantitative representations, such as formulas, graphs, or tables.
  • b. Use algebraic, numerical, graphical, or statistical methods to draw accurate conclusions and solve mathematical problems which include differential analysis.
  • c. Represent quantitative problems expressed in a natural language in a suitable mathematical format.
  • d. Effectively communicate quantitative analysis or solutions to mathematical problems in written or oral form.
  • e. Evaluate solutions to problems for reasonableness using a variety of means, including informed estimation.
  • f. Apply mathematical methods to problems in other fields of study.

Note:  These learning objectives are identical to those for Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning in the Pathways Common Core (see http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/academic-news/files/2011/12/CommonCoreStructureFinalRec.pdf).

Introduction to Psychology
Appropriate to the level of an introductory course, students will be able to:

  • a. Analyze and evaluate research methods that make Psychology a science, including the advantages and disadvantages of each research method, as well as how they are complementary.
  • b. Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises with regards to both  research and therapy.
  • c. Understand basic psychological theories, principles, and concepts.
  • d. Explain how individual differences influence beliefs, values, and interactions with others.
  • e. Apply psychological concepts and principles to their own lives and experiences.

Psychology

Introduction to Psychology
Appropriate to the level of an introductory course, students will be able to:

  • a. Analyze and evaluate research methods that make Psychology a science, including the advantages and disadvantages of each research method, as well as how they are complementary.
  • b. Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises with regards to both research and therapy.
  • c. Understand basic psychological theories, principles, and concepts.
  • d. Explain how individual differences influence beliefs, values, and interactions with others.
  • e. Apply psychological concepts and principles to their own lives and experiences.

Either an Abnormal Psychology or a Personality Psychology course
Abnormal Psychology: After taking this course students will be able to:

  • a. Understand the rationale for categorizing behavior as “normal” or “abnormal” and how views of the causation and treatment of mental illnesses have changed over time.
  • b. Demonstrate understanding of how major theoretical approaches, such as the biological, psychoanalytic, and cognitive, address the development, categorization, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illnesses.
  • c. Demonstrate understanding of the purposes and processes of clinical assessment and diagnosis based on presenting symptoms and other relevant information and recognize the benefits and disadvantages of making diagnoses in today’s world.
  • d. Identify treatment options and the process used to select appropriate treatments as well as the current practical, legal, social, and ethical concerns regarding the treatment of the psychologically ill in modern society.

Personality Psychology: After taking this course students will be able to:

  • a. Identify, understand and critically evaluate the central theories and concepts in personality psychology.
  • b. Analyze hypotheses and research findings relating to achieving valid and reliable theories of personality from multiple conceptual perspectives.
  • c. Apply the theoretical concepts in personality psychology to human behavior.
  • d. Understand the ways personality can be assessed and the challenges that measurement can present.
  • e. Examine cultural, gender and individual differences in the study of personality psychology.

Either a Child Development or a Lifespan Development course
Child Development: After taking this course students will be able to:

  • a. Critically evaluate the major theories of child development and demonstrate understanding of their influence on the field of psychology and related fields.
  • b. Critically analyze the significance of—and interactions between–the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains in the process of child development.
  • c. Describe the research methodologies used to study child development, demonstrate understanding of the benefits and limitations of research in laboratory and non-laboratory settings, and critically evaluate relevant research.
  • d. Examine cultural, gender and individual differences in the study of child development.
  • e. Gain insight into child development and apply knowledge learned to current issues in the field and to the student’s own life experiences.

Lifespan Development: After taking this course students will be able to:

  • a. Critically evaluate the major theories of lifespan development and demonstrate understanding of their influence on the field of psychology and related fields.
  • b. Critically analyze the significance of —and interactions between–the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains in the process of lifespan development.
  • c. Describe the research methodology used to study lifespan development, demonstrate understanding of the benefits and limitations of research in laboratory and non-laboratory settings, and critically evaluate relevant research.
  • d. Examine cultural, gender and individual differences in the study of lifespan development.
  • e. Gain insight into lifespan development and apply knowledge learned to current issues in the field and to the student’s own life experiences.

Teacher Education

Social Foundations of Education
This course introduces students to the field of education through examination of its cultural, social, historical, and philosophical aspects. Learning Outcomes:

  • a. Demonstrate an understanding of historical, philosophical, sociological and political foundations of education.
  • b. Develop an understanding of the way in which schools reproduce or reduce inequality in schooling and schools.
  • c. Integrate the use of technology in ways that will enable students to extend opportunities for communication and inquiry in educational contexts.
  • d. Examine the role of culture, language, race, class, gender, sexual preference, and (dis)ability in schools.
  • e. Analyze the restrictions and responsibilities of education reforms and policies aimed at eliminating achievement and opportunity gaps.
  • f. Develop an understanding of the politics of education and its impact on formerly marginalized groups, such as second language learners, and learners with special needs.
  • g. Demonstrate in writing clear evidence of critical analysis of content knowledge and accurate use of grammar.

Psychological Foundations of Education (Child Development)
This course provides an overview of human development from conception to adolescence and its application to teaching and learning.

Overall Development

  • a. Understand the major theorists and their contributions to the discovery of child and adolescent physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.
  • b. Understand physiological, cognitive, social, and emotional, development within each age level from conception through adolescence.
  • c. Understand the effect of biological and environmental influences on development and learning.

Issues of Diversity

  • a. Understand that development is affected by variables such as race, class, gender, and culture.
  • b. Apply theoretical knowledge to increase and improve skills for working with a diverse population of students.

Social Contexts of Psychological Development

  • a. Understand the essential issues of child development by analyzing the role of family, community, and school ask well as the impact of larger social contexts (i.e., race, class, and culture).
  • b. Address how specialized and urban educational environments may impact learning and development.

Arts in Education
The New York State teacher certification requires that “artistic expression” be included in teacher preparation programs for teachers at all levels.  This course provides an overview of one of the major forms of artistic expression (dance, music, theatre, visual art, moving image) and the application to teaching and learning.

  • a. Demonstrate knowledge of the relationship between the arts, culture and diversity.
  • b. Analyze the nature of different forms of art.
  • c. Explain the role of creativity in people’s lives.
  • d. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories and current research on artistic growth and development of children.
  • e. Describe the implications of the major theories and current research on artistic growth and development of children for teaching.
  • f. Demonstrate knowledge of some of the processes, materials and instruments used in the creation of a particular form of art: dance, music, theatre, visual art, or moving image.
  • g. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use different materials, instruments or processes to create art in the classroom.