CUNY in the News

Huffington Post: Here’s What is Really Means to be Intersex

January 27, 2017 | Books, CUNY in the News

Hanne Gaby Odiele, a 28-year-old Belgian supermodel, recently became one of the first public figures to be openly intersex. The globetrotting model, who’s walked the runway for designers such as Chanel and Prada, has found a new role as an advocate for perhaps the most misunderstood and stigmatized gender identity. This week, Odiele announced that […]

City Lab: New York City Has Been Zoned To Segregate

January 27, 2017 | Books, CUNY in the News

New York City is often romanticized as a mecca of multicultural urban living. But as diverse as it is, residents from very different backgrounds don’t often live in the same neighborhoods. In fact, New York is in second place after Milwaukee as far as black-white segregation goes. Today, historical color lines are being redrawn through […]

Chancellor James Milliken Lays Out New Vision for CUNY

January 24, 2017 | CUNY in the News

By LESLIE BRODY January 24, 2017 Spelling out a new vision for the sprawling City University of New York, Chancellor James B. Milliken said Monday he wants to add full-time faculty and advisers, expand job internships for students and streamline administration. Many elements of his plan seek to improve the institution’s low graduation rates, a […]

“Fantastic Art China” Presents Four Art Exhibitions Showcasing the Greatest Chinese Contemporary Artists and Emerging Artists from the U.S. and China

January 24, 2017 | CUNY in the News

January 24, 2017 The third “Happy Chinese New Year: Fantastic Art China,” a nine-day festival celebrating 2017 “Year of The Rooster,” will be held January 23rd-31st at iconic cultural venues and landmarks across New York City. The festival will be headlined by three arts exhibitions at the Metropolitan Pavilion (125 W 18th st) and one […]

Dominican Today: NEH funds CUNY DSI study of Dominican music in the US

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News

The CCNY-based CUNY DSI has received an NEH grant to study the history of Dominican music in the U.S. The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute at The City College of New York is embarking on another ground breaking digital project. A $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will fund the first online […]

Live Science: Possible Medieval ‘Synagogue’ Uncovered Near Sea of Galilee

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

A medieval building that may have been used as a synagogue has been uncovered at the site of Huqoq, a village near the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Constructed during the 12th to 13thcenturies, the building is located on top of the ruins of a fifth-century Roman synagogue known to contain fantastic mosaics, including one […]

Possible Medieval ‘Synagogue’ Uncovered Near Sea of Galilee

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

By Owen Jarus January 23, 2017 A medieval building that may have been used as a synagogue has been uncovered at the site of Huqoq, a village near the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Constructed during the 12th to 13thcenturies, the building is located on top of the ruins of a fifth-century Roman synagogue known […]

Virtual Reality Lab Heading to Lehman College

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

By Eddie Small January 23, 2017 Bronxites will soon have a way to learn about virtual and augmented reality besides playing Pokémon GO. A new virtual reality training lab is on its way to CUNY on the Concourse, a branch of Lehman College at 2501 Grand Concourse, where the school will offer an 11-month program starting on April 24 to […]

NY Times: America’s Great Working Class Colleges

January 20, 2017 | CUNY in the News

The heyday of the colleges that serve America’s working class can often feel very long ago. It harks back to the mid-20th century, when City College of New York cost only a few hundred dollars a year and was known as the “Harvard of the proletariat.” Out West, California built an entire university system that […]

PHYS.ORG: Big Data suggests colleges are leveling the economic playing field

January 20, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Two students attend the same college. One is from a low-income background, while the other’s family is in the top 20 percent of earners nationwide. When it comes to annual earnings in their mid-thirties, which student is likely to earn more? A new study coauthored by John Friedman, associate professor of economics and international and […]

NY Times: A Passport Stamp Gives Dreamers Hope as The Trump Era Looms

January 20, 2017 | CUNY in the News

When the customs agent at Kennedy International Airport stamped Jenifer Guzman Gonzalez’s Mexican passport on Monday, Ms. Guzman was too anxious to look at it. Back at her family’s apartment in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Ms. Guzman started crying as she flipped to Page 5. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/18/nyregion/a-passport-stamp-gives-dreamers-hope-as-the-trump-era-looms.html

Constitution Daily: Remembering the first black Cabinet member

January 17, 2017 | CUNY in the News

President Lyndon Baines Johnson fought for and won congressional approval for Weaver, who was then 59 years old, with diminished opposition from southern Democrats. Five years earlier, President John F. Kennedy failed in a similar move. Weaver was born on December 29, 1907 in segregated Washington, D.C. His grandfather was Dr. Robert Tanner Freeman, the […]

Riverdale Press: In contest with dread disease, athlete hopes for victory

January 17, 2017 | CUNY in the News

For some athletes, the biggest battles happen off-field. Maurice Whyte is one of those rare athletes whose superior athletic ability just seems to come naturally. During his tenure at Lehman College, Whyte has been a captain of the Lightning track and field team and has been a two-time captain of the soccer team. There are […]

NY Times: Exploring New York, on Foot and With Maps

January 17, 2017 | Books, CUNY in the News

When William B. Helmreich was growing up on the Upper West Side, he and his father would play a game they called last stop. They would take a subway line to its terminus and wander a new neighborhood. After they exhausted the last stops, they got off at the penultimate stations. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/12/nyregion/brooklyn-nobody-knows-william-b-helmreich.html

LOHUD: Pearl River startup gets $1M for battery plant…

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

One of the newest tenants at the former Pfizer campus aims to change the way we store electricity, using the same materials that power our TV remote controls or flashlights. Urban Electric Power, a battery manufacturing startup, focuses on reliable, rechargeable batteries based on zinc and manganese dioxide, the same ingredients used for non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. http://www.lohud.com/story/money/business/2016/12/16/pearl-river-battery-plant/95356434/

PHYS.ORG: Mathematical model sheds light on timing of key intracellular events

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Phage therapy, which exploits the ability of certain viruses to infect and replicate within bacteria, shows promise for treating antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. But the design of such therapies depends on a solid understanding of how phages do their work. “Phages can kill the cell immediately, or they can become dormant and kill it later,” says […]

EIN News: Faculty-Driven Innovation at CUNY Medgar Evers Optimizes Gateway Courses for Student Success

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Medgar Evers College, a senior college of The City University of New York (CUNY), today announced a partnership with Echo360 to provide faculty with classroom tools and analytics to increase student engagement and develop digital pedagogies to enhance student success in first and second-year courses. “The incorporation of cutting-edge video technology will give a strong […]

Scientific American: Do DIY Brain-Booster Devices Work?

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

It began more than a decade ago, as engineers and hobbyists started getting increasingly enthralled with a jury-rigged electric technology that purportedly enhanced brain function. The movement is still growing, and the brain-zappers are no longer just young garage tinkerers—now they include older professionals who fork over hundreds of dollars for high-grade wearable systems. As […]

Science Daily: Do dogs of all ages respond equally to dog directed speech?

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

People tend to talk to dogs as though they are human babies. A new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that people speak more slowly and with a higher tone to dogs of all ages — both adults and puppies — and that puppies respond most readily to this dog-directed speech. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170111151828.htm

Washington Post: The U.S. is becoming more racially diverse. But Democrats…

January 6, 2017 | CUNY in the News

In the aftermath of the presidential election, the Democratic Party has been in the midst of a heated debate over “identity politics,” ignited partly by an op-ed by the Columbia University intellectual historian Mark Lilla. Lilla and his supporters argue that Hillary Clinton’s campaign focused too much on reaching out to specific groups, especially minorities, […]