Science

Live Science: Possible Medieval ‘Synagogue’ Uncovered Near Sea of Galilee

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

A medieval building that may have been used as a synagogue has been uncovered at the site of Huqoq, a village near the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Constructed during the 12th to 13thcenturies, the building is located on top of the ruins of a fifth-century Roman synagogue known to contain fantastic mosaics, including one […]

RD: The Tyranny of Politeness

January 23, 2017 | Science

We have been told since toddlerhood that politeness is a virtue. And so it is. The word comes from the Latin polire, to smooth or polish. By showing respect for others, politeness smooths the abrasive edges of social interaction, making decent and necessary compromises possible. Could it ever be a vice? The ancients wisely said, […]

Possible Medieval ‘Synagogue’ Uncovered Near Sea of Galilee

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

By Owen Jarus January 23, 2017 A medieval building that may have been used as a synagogue has been uncovered at the site of Huqoq, a village near the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Constructed during the 12th to 13thcenturies, the building is located on top of the ruins of a fifth-century Roman synagogue known […]

Virtual Reality Lab Heading to Lehman College

January 23, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

By Eddie Small January 23, 2017 Bronxites will soon have a way to learn about virtual and augmented reality besides playing Pokémon GO. A new virtual reality training lab is on its way to CUNY on the Concourse, a branch of Lehman College at 2501 Grand Concourse, where the school will offer an 11-month program starting on April 24 to […]

PHYS.ORG: Big Data suggests colleges are leveling the economic playing field

January 20, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Two students attend the same college. One is from a low-income background, while the other’s family is in the top 20 percent of earners nationwide. When it comes to annual earnings in their mid-thirties, which student is likely to earn more? A new study coauthored by John Friedman, associate professor of economics and international and […]

LOHUD: Pearl River startup gets $1M for battery plant…

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

One of the newest tenants at the former Pfizer campus aims to change the way we store electricity, using the same materials that power our TV remote controls or flashlights. Urban Electric Power, a battery manufacturing startup, focuses on reliable, rechargeable batteries based on zinc and manganese dioxide, the same ingredients used for non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. http://www.lohud.com/story/money/business/2016/12/16/pearl-river-battery-plant/95356434/

PHYS.ORG: Mathematical model sheds light on timing of key intracellular events

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Phage therapy, which exploits the ability of certain viruses to infect and replicate within bacteria, shows promise for treating antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. But the design of such therapies depends on a solid understanding of how phages do their work. “Phages can kill the cell immediately, or they can become dormant and kill it later,” says […]

Eureka Alert: Play, cognitive skills in kindergarten predict extracurricular activities in middle school

January 12, 2017 | Science

Cognitive skills and experiences like classroom-based play in kindergarten lead to participation in extracurricular activities in 8th grade among children growing up in poverty, finds a new study led by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The findings, published in Applied Developmental Science, look at extracurricular activities as precursors to civic engagement, […]

Eureka Alert: Cultural differences may leave their mark on DNA

January 12, 2017 | Science

A UC San Francisco-led study has identified signatures of ethnicity in the genome that appear to reflect an ethnic group’s shared culture and environment, rather than their common genetic ancestry. The study examined DNA methylation — an “annotation” of DNA that alters gene expression without changing the genomic sequence itself — in a group of […]

EIN News: Faculty-Driven Innovation at CUNY Medgar Evers Optimizes Gateway Courses for Student Success

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Medgar Evers College, a senior college of The City University of New York (CUNY), today announced a partnership with Echo360 to provide faculty with classroom tools and analytics to increase student engagement and develop digital pedagogies to enhance student success in first and second-year courses. “The incorporation of cutting-edge video technology will give a strong […]

Scientific American: Do DIY Brain-Booster Devices Work?

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

It began more than a decade ago, as engineers and hobbyists started getting increasingly enthralled with a jury-rigged electric technology that purportedly enhanced brain function. The movement is still growing, and the brain-zappers are no longer just young garage tinkerers—now they include older professionals who fork over hundreds of dollars for high-grade wearable systems. As […]

The Atlantic: In Germany, Parents Can Sue the Government for Failing To Provide Childcare

January 12, 2017 | Science

You’ve had a baby—congratulations! Now, when will you be returning to work? For most parents, their answer depends on the arrangements they can find for child care—this is especially true for mothers, who, despite many changes to society over the past century, remain primarily responsible for childrearing across industrialized nations. The difficulty of securing daycare […]

Science Daily: Do dogs of all ages respond equally to dog directed speech?

January 12, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

People tend to talk to dogs as though they are human babies. A new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that people speak more slowly and with a higher tone to dogs of all ages — both adults and puppies — and that puppies respond most readily to this dog-directed speech. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170111151828.htm

NPR: Staying Fit Isn’t A New Year’s Resolution for These Hunter-Gatherers

January 6, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

  After the countdown to New Year’s, Americans start thinking about upping the intensity of their workouts or making room in their schedule for a boot camp. But the men and women of the Hadza, a group of hunter-gatherers in Northern Tanzania, have no need for resolutions to be more active. Anthropologist Herman Pontzer, an […]

PR Newswire: New University Research Center to Test Boundaries of Smart Transportation in NYC

January 5, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

The U.S. Department of Transportation has selected a research consortium led by the New York University Tandon School of Engineering to become the first Tier 1 University Transportation Center (UTC) in New York City, charged with taking on some of the most pressing mobility challenges facing urban areas of all sizes. The consortium proposal, led by […]

U.S. News and World Report: A Compelling Case for Curriculum

January 5, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

One of the odd features of education policy is that while a plethora of research exists on the effects of systemic reforms (e.g., class size, charter schools, teacher and school accountability mechanisms), on student achievement there is very little data on whether curriculum – what kids are actually being taught – makes a difference. As […]

Photonics Media: CUNY, Columbia Researchers to Publish, Edit Reference Book on Deep Tissue…

January 5, 2017 | CUNY in the News, Science

Pan Stanford is set to publish a reference book for new deep tissue imaging techniques on January 31. The book is edited by Robert R. Alfano, a leader in the field of ultrafast laser spectroscopy at the City College of the City University of New York, and Lingyan Shi, a leader in the field of […]

Live Science: Time of Death Check the Body’s “Necrobiome”

December 28, 2016 | CUNY in the News, Science

It’s a line you’ll hear in almost any crime show after someone finds the body — the detective turns to the medical examiner and asks, “Time of death?” But in real life, medical examiners don’t have a very precise method for figuring out how long ago someone died. Now, researchers say they could use the […]

PhilStar Global: Dogs can make you feel better

December 28, 2016 | CUNY in the News, Science

Daddy, I want a dog.” How often have we heard our kids tell us to get them a pet dog? And if you think that owning a dog is more of an inconvenience rather than a plus in your life, then think again. According to noted pet expert Dr. Diane Pomerance, the benefits of owning […]

Quartz: The US pays a price for keeping immigrants underemployed

December 28, 2016 | Science

US president-elect Donald Trump pledged to get America’s economy growing by 4% a year. Legalizing unauthorized immigrants would take him a long way toward that goal. Undocumented workers generate 3% of US GDP, or $5 trillion over 10 years, according to a new analysis from two economists at Queens College in New York. If the […]