Governor Pataki Signs Legislation Renaming “New York City College of Technology”

July 17, 2002 | The University

Governor George E. Pataki today publicly signed off on legislation changing the name of New York City Technical College to New York City College of Technology, marking an important step in the college’s successful transition from its community college origins to a premier baccalaureate degree-granting institution.

“New York City College of Technology has been an outstanding institution, but it has grown, it has improved, it has upgraded,” the Governor said. “It has created an important academic niche for itself in New York State as The City University of New York’s (CUNY) college of technology and one of New York State’s designated colleges of technology.”

Pataki added that just as the State University of New York has become stronger and CUNY “is getting much stronger,” it is important to focus on the individual colleges that make up these two universities. “This is a very positive day, not just for New York City College of Technology but for CUNY and the students of our great state,” he said.

Elaborating on the name change, New York City College of Technology President Fred W. Beaufait said, “While the term ‘technical college’ had broader implications in times past, in today’s educational marketplace technical colleges are generally two-year schools offering vocational programs.

“New York City College of Technology is positioning itself to further enhance its image, attract top-notch students and respond to the current and future technological needs of public and private sector employers,” he continued. “The college will benefit from this new name, which clearly defines its mission, programs and the sophistication of the technological instruction it offers.”

New York City College of Technology currently offers 50 career-specific baccalaureate, associate and specialized certificate programs in 21st century technologies. Many of these are regionally or nationally unique, and new baccalaureate programs at the cutting edge of technology are in the pipeline.

“Anticipated new baccalaureate degree programs in Architectural Technology and Applied Mathematics, and others under study or in development, will provide increased options for transfer students and will enable more of our associate degree program graduates to continue their studies here,” said New York City College of Technology Provost Joann La Perla.

Currently serving more than 11,000 degree students, the college has twice the enrollment of the largest of the eight State University of New York (SUNY) institutions identified as “colleges of technology.” Another 10,000 students enroll annually in scores of adult education and workforce development programs.

New York City College of Technology’s name has changed before in order to take into account major shifts in the economy of the region. It was founded in 1946 as the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences in response to the needs of business, industry and the professions for highly trained technicians and other specialists for the post-war economy. In 1953 it was renamed New York City Community College, becoming the city’s first community college, and was made part of The City University of New York (CUNY) in 1964.

The privately-endowed Voorhees Technical Institute was incorporated into the college in 1971, giving the college roots dating back to 1881. In 1980, it was designated “a technical institute within the CUNY system” and was renamed New York City Technical College (City Tech).

Its name has changed to New York City College of Technology, but there’s one thing that remains the same: the college’s nickname is still City Tech.

New York City College of Technology of The City University of New York is a recognized national model for urban technological education and a pioneer in integrating technology into the teaching/learning experience. Fifty career-specific baccalaureate, associate and specialized certificate programs are offered in the technologies of art and design, business, computer systems, engineering, entertainment, health care, hospitality, human services, the law-related professions, occupational and technology teacher education, and the liberal arts and sciences. Located at 300 Jay Street in Downtown Brooklyn, City Tech is part of the MetroTech Center academic and commercial complex.