BCC Student Chooses Forensics: Scientific Path to Solving Crimes

December 17, 2009 | Bronx Community College

Bronx, NY - First-year student Jacqueline DiPasquale joined the Bronx Community College (BCC) Forensics Program because of a couple of hardships in her life. “My 13-year-old little brother was shot twice in August 2008.  Luckily, he survived, but he remained in the hospital for two months. Another person in the group, my friend, Anthony Morales, was killed. The people who did this were never found and I have never found answers as to why this tragedy occurred,” says DiPasquale.

“The incident influenced my decision to enroll in BCC’s Forensics Program. I want to be a forensic scientist so that I can help  solve crimes in court cases. I want to give my four-year-old son a good future,” she adds.  Her choice will also provide a pathway for her to go into law enforcement, become a detective, or study law.

A graduate of Christopher Columbus High School, the 21-year-old second-semester student says that her avid interest in forensics, the study of science as it relates to crime, began when she started watching TV crime programs such as “The First 48.”

DiPasquale, whose mother attended BCC and supports her daughter’s career interest, says that she likes the BCC campus and the faculty. “The best part is being in classes with students who are as smart as I am, and are trying to do something with their lives. We can relate to each other.  We all live in the Bronx, and we all aspire to greatness.” She’s excited by the fact that her studying is for a joint degree with John Jay College. “You might say, BCC opens doors to a four-year college,” adds DiPasquale, who in 2011 plans to be the first in her family to graduate from college.

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Please call: Bryant Mason
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Founded in 1957, Bronx Community College (BCC), the oldest of City University of New York’s six community colleges, serves as the engine for academic and economic mobility for motivated students from diverse backgrounds and preparations. More than 10,500 students from over 109 nations are enrolled in 30 associate degree and certificate programs including Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Computer Graphics, Nuclear Medicine, and Business Administration, Digital Arts, Computer Information Systems, Education Associate, Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology, Electronic Engineering Technology, Liberal Arts, Marketing, Accounting, Human Services, Media Technology and Paralegal Studies. BCC’s 43-acre campus, high above the Harlem River, features architectural masterpieces of Stanford White and Marcel Breuer, as well as the Hall of Fame of Great Americans, the nation’s first hall of fame. BCC President Carolyn G. Williams is in her 13th year of leadership service to the College, which is located on a 43-acre campus at 2155 University Avenue at West 181st Street , formerly New York University’s uptown campus until 1973.

The College is home to initiatives not commonly associated with two-year institutions, such as the Center for Sustainable Energy, which promotes the use of renewable and efficient energy technologies in urban communities. The National Center for Educational Alliances (NCEA) is currently collaborating with South African Further Education and Training Colleges and universities to create linkages between these institutions. NCEA also coordinates the College’s international initiatives and the annual International Education Week.

The Center has also facilitated a campus wide effort to create BCC’s Center for Tolerance and Understanding. The Center for Teaching Excellence offers faculty development to promote student achievement and to stimulate discussions to keep the teaching and learning process vital and dynamic. Take a look at BCC’s website at www.bcc.cuny.edu