Medgar Evers College RN Program Achieves 100% Passing Rate on Major Exam

March 9, 2010 | Medgar Evers College

For a second year in a row, students enrolled in the RN program at Medgar Evers College have received a 100% passing rate on the NCLEX-RN exam. Students who took this exam are enrolled in the AAS program at the College. In 2009, there were 28 graduates of the program, and of the 28, 27 students took and passed the exam.

“As we continue to improve and strengthen our nursing programs, the department and students will continue to strive for excellence,” said Professor Heather Gibson, Chairperson of the Department of Nursing – AAS/PN.

The number of graduates doubled from 2008; last year 14 graduates from the AAS program took and passed the exam. Additionally, we are looking forward to greater things from the students as the enrollment has increased in the admitting class to 60 students.

In other AAS/PN Nursing department related news, Anthony White, a student in the LPN Program, was recently announced as a finalist of the 2009-2010 Vanguard Award. The purpose of the award is to acknowledge students enrolled in programs leading to nontraditional careers for their gender.

About Medgar Evers College, CUNY

Medgar Evers College was founded in 1970 through the efforts from educators and community leaders in central Brooklyn. The College is named after Medgar Wiley Evers, a Mississippi-born black civil rights activist who was assassinated on June 12, 1963. The College is divided into four schools: The School of Business; The School of Professional and Community Development; The School of Liberal Arts and Education; and The School of Science, Health, and Technology. Through these Schools, the College offers 29 associate and baccalaureate degree programs, as well as certificate programs in fields such as English, Nursing, and Accounting. Medgar Evers College also operates several co-curricular and external programs and associated centers such as the Male Development and Empowerment Center, the Center for Women’s Development, the Center for Black Literature, and The DuBois Bunche Center for Public Policy.