Hunter Distinguished Professor Nancy Foner Named to American Academy of Arts & Sciences

April 27, 2011 | Hunter College

Nancy Foner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter and the CUNY Graduate Center, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a leading center for independent policy research and one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies.

“It is a privilege to honor these men and women for their extraordinary individual accomplishments,” said Leslie Berlowitz, president of the Academy, adding: “The knowledge and expertise of our members give the Academy a unique capacity to provide practical policy solutions to the pressing challenges of the day.” Members of the honorary society contribute to Academy studies of science and technology policy, global security, social policy and American institutions, the humanities, and education.

Dr. Foner’s main area of interest is immigration, and she has written widely on immigration to New York City. Particularly interested in the comparative study of immigration, she has studied current immigration to the U.S. as it compares with immigration during earlier periods; the immigrant experience in various American gateway cities; and immigrant minorities in the United States and Europe.

Foner is the author or editor of 14 books and the author of more than 85 articles and book chapters. Among her books are From Ellis Island to JFK: New York’s Two Great Waves of Immigration (Yale University Press, 2000), winner of the 2000 Theodore Saloutos Award of the Immigration and Ethnic History Society; and her latest book, Across Generations: Immigrant Families in America (New York University Press, 2009).

“It’s a great honor to be elected to the Academy and recognized for my work as an immigration scholar,” said Foner. “It’s especially important now, when immigration is such a crucial issue for this country. And it’s important for Hunter, which is not only a public institution in the quintessential immigrant city–but a college where the vast majority of students are either immigrants themselves or immigrants’ children.”

In 2010 Foner received the Distinguished Career Award from the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association. She is on the editorial board of numerous journals, has testified on immigration issues before several Congressional committees, has been chair of the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association, and is past president of the Society for the Anthropology of Work and of the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology.