A Basketball Coach in Your Pocket

October 3, 2012 | Salute to Scholars, The University

From left, Abbatiello with partners Mike Dietz, Tammer Farid and Joseph Cafarelli

A  popular workout app created by Baruch College alumni is bringing a digital twist to the athletic training of basketball players.

Four former Baruch College men’s basketball teammates are the proprietors behind a highly rated basketball-training app called “OneBasketball.”

“This is the new and innovative way for basketball training,” says co-founder Mickey Abbatiello, who earned a bachelor’s in business administration and finance from Baruch in May 2012. “Our mission is to give all the basketball players the opportunity to progress their games by literally placing the tools and information in the palm of their hands,” says Abbatiello.

Created as an off-season tool to keep college and high school basketball players in shape, Abbatiello insisted that the app could be used by anyone. “We got feedback from a mother who downloaded it to train her two kids. She loved it. She felt like a coach and didn’t have to pay for expensive lessons and a trainer for her children.”

The OneBasketball mobile app, which made its debut in the app store in December 2011, can now be downloaded for free on iPods, iPhones and iPads. The training app features 140 basketball drills with video demonstrations and step-by-step instructions. It also includes 16 structured workouts and a “Shot Tracker” system that allow athletes to record and track workout performance.

“There is really nothing like our app in the App Store.  It is very thoughtful and well planned out and basically replaces a trainer. Others are very limited — they have eight drills, but we give you much more,” he says.

The app, which has been downloaded in more than 25 countries, has received positive feedback from coaches, players and parents. “We have over 1,500 people downloading it. That’s a good sample to know that you have a good product and we haven’t even broached the full potential of the app yet,” says Abbatiello.

“My partners and I are all basketball fanatics. We just want to pass down what we know to the kids and give them some structure on how to start training the right way early on,” adds Abbatiello.