Grants and Honors: Recognizing Faculty Achievement

November 5, 2012 | CUNY Matters, The University

The University’s renowned faculty members continually win professional-achievement awards from prestigious organizations as well as research grants from government agencies, farsighted foundations and leading corporations. Pictured are just a few of the recent honorees. Brief summaries of many ongoing research projects start here and continue inside.

The CUNY Board of Trustees has named three outstanding scholars as Distinguished Professors, the University’s highest faculty rank. They are: Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History, Graduate School and University Center, internationally renowned authority on the history of religion in Europe and the U.S., on the Holocaust and its aftermath, and on the histories of gender and sexuality; John Matteson, Distinguished Professor of English, John Jay College, winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in Biography for Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father; Jeffrey T. Parsons, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Hunter College, leading authority on health behaviors, HIV prevention and HIV medication adherence.

The Spencer Foundation has awarded a two-year $335,450 grant to Alexandra W. Logue, Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost, and Mari Watanabe-Rose, a postdoctoral fellow in the Office of Academic Affairs, for “Mainstreaming Mathematics Remedial Students: A Random Assignment Experiment.” Fred Moshary of City College has been awarded $310,000 from Princeton University for “NSF – Engineering Research Center (ERC) on Mid-Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment (MIRTH).”

Hunter College’s Public Service Scholar Program (PSSP) has been selected to partner with the NY State Department of Environmental Conservation to create a pipeline for a more diverse environmental public service workforce. Since its founding in 1982, approximately 80 percent of PSSP alumni have gone on to leadership posts in public and nonprofit public service agencies and more than 75 percent have earned or pursued graduate degrees. In addition, over 75 percent have won highly competitive fellowships with the city’s Government Scholars Program and Urban Fellows Program, as well as Clark, Coro, HUD Renaissance, Congressional Hispanic Caucus and other prestigious fellowships. Up to 24 Hunter juniors and seniors are admitted to PSSP annually. They receive $6,000 stipends and are placed at a nonprofit or government agency for 20-hour/week internships while participating in two weekly seminars focusing on their internship work and ongoing public policy issues in the city. Elaine M. Walsh, the PSSP director, says: “Leadership development programs for women, minority group members and immigrants are especially important in the nonprofit and public sectors, where they have historically formed the bulk of the workforce while having little opportunity to advance to leadership.”

Sunghoon Jang of New York City College of Technology has received $599,792 from the National Science Foundation for “Engineering the Future: Pathways to Success for Women and Underrepresented Students in the Engineering Technologies.” The National Institutes of Health has awarded $621,021 to John M. Tarbell, Chair and Wallace Coulter Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at City College, for “Endo-thelial Glycocalyx” research. Kingsborough Community College has received $375,000 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for “Petrologic-Geochemical Studies of Reduced Solar System Matter,” directed by Michael Weisberg. Kleanthis Psarris of Brooklyn College has received a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for “Collaborative Research: Flow-Sensitive Program Analysis for Speculative Parallelization.”

Robert Gyles of Hunter College has received $444,410 from the New York City Department of Education for a “Math Center for Learning & Teaching/Continuing Education — District 30.” Clarence Stanley of Lehman College has been awarded $302,000 from the State University of New York: Research Foundation for the “New York State Small Business Development Center.” Kingsborough Community College has received $197,413 from the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City for the “SIF Young Adult Program,” under the direction of Saul W. Katz. The “Health Workforce Retraining Initiative,” directed by Michele Stewart of LaGuardia Community College, has been awarded a $182,134 grant from the New York State Department of Health. Maria Contel of Brooklyn College has received $155,430 from the National Institutes of Health for research concerning “SC2: Organogold Phosphorus-Containing Compounds as Antitumor Agents.”

The United States Department of Energy has awarded Queens College $2,155,000 for a “Former Worker Surveillance Program,” a health study directed by Steven Markowitz. Jean Callahan of Hunter College has received $392,260 in grant funding from the New York State Office of Temporary & Disability Assistance for a “Housing Training Resource System.” Stefan Becker of Lehman College has received a $166,269 grant from the New York State Education Department for “Teacher Education for Advance Science Preparation.” The “CCNY Nuclear Research Fellowship Program,” directed by Masahiro Kawaji of City College, has received $400,000 from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The National Institutes of Health has awarded $154,729 in grant support to Jason Rauceo of John Jay College for research on “Yeast Cell Wall Damage Response Pathways.”

“NYS Spinal Cord Injury Research Program,” directed by Maria Knikou of the College of Staten Island, has received a $359,404 grant from the New York State Department of Health. Sandra Watson and Jane McKillop of LaGuardia Community College have received $252,222 in grant support from the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City for the “CUNY Fatherhood Academy.”

Jeffrey Halperin of Queens College has received two grants from the National Institutes of Health, totaling $844,545, for research concerning “Neurodevelopmental Perspectives on ADHD” and “Training Executive, Attention, and Motor Skills (TEAMS): Preliminary Studies.” Hunter College has been awarded $306,000 from PHS/NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences for a project, directed by Benjamin Ortiz, titled “Translating TCRa Locus Control Region Activity to T Cell Gene Therapy Vectors.” The New York State Office of Children & Family Services has awarded Gerald Mallon of Hunter College $412,025 for a “Post-Adolescent Services Resource Network.” The National Science Foundation has awarded $150,001 to Ray Gavin of Brooklyn College for “Functional of an Unconventional Myosin in Tetrahymena.”

“Toward Human-Like Understanding in Breakthrough Operational Language Technologies (Thunderbolt),” a research project directed by Heng Ji of Queens College, has received $215,674 in grant support from DARPA/SRI International. The National Science Foundation has awarded $400,000 in grant funding to Shamik Sengupta of John Jay College for “The Self-Coexistence Project.” Zhigang Zhu, Tony Ro, and Yingli Tian of City College have been awarded $100,000 from the National Science Foundation for a research project titled “EFRIM3C: Mobility Skill Acquisition and Learning through Alternative and Multimodal Perception for Visually Impaired People.”

Ann Jacobs and Jeffrey Butts of John Jay College have received $442,143 from the Pinkerton Foundation for “The Establishment of the Pinkerton Fellows Program.” Christine Alvarez of LaGuardia Community College was awarded $389,150 from the New York City Department of Small Business Services for “EMT S.A.V.E.” “Solvation Directed Design of Flavonoid Derivatives for Caspase Inhibition,” directed by Thomas Young of Lehman College, has received a $122,250 grant from the National Institutes of Health. Shannon Bryant of LaGuardia Community College has received a $604,040 grant from the New York City Department of Small Business Services for the “Health Care Sector Center.” Christian Grov of Brooklyn College received $147,964 from the National Institutes of Health for a project concerning “HIV Risk and Venues for Meeting Sex Partners.”

LaGuardia Community College has been awarded a $729,757 grant from the Robin Hood Foundation (MDRC) for the “GED Bridge Pilot Project,” under the direction of Amy Dalsimer. The Hospital League 1199 has awarded $375,000 to Hugo Kijne of the College of Staten Island for the “Clinical Education Agreement-Staten Island Hospital.” Amy Ikui of Brooklyn College has received $155,430 from the National Institutes of Health for “SC2: A Novel Function of Orc6 during Mitosis in S. Cerevisiae.” Mary-Jo Kranacher, chair of the accounting and finance department at York College, has received the Outstanding Achievement Award of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners for her outstanding contributions as an anti-fraud professional.

The National Academies Transportation Research Board has awarded a $249,410 grant to Charles Jennings of John Jay College for “Best Practices in Hazardous Material Pipeline Emergency Response Plans.” Harriet Goodman of Hunter College has received $180,470 from The New York City Human Resources Administration for “Delivery of Social Services Training/Education to Employees of NYC through Innovative Learning Technologies.” A project directed by Richard Veit of the College of Staten Island — “Modeling Wildlife Densities and Habitat use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales Over the Mid-Atlantic Continental Shelf” — has received a $144,612 grant from the United States Department of Energy. Marie Filbin, Distinguished Professor of Biology at Hunter College, has received a $343,610 grant from PHS/NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke for a study of the “Role of Myelin in Spinal Cord Regeneration.” Hyungsik Lim of Hunter College has received $102,912 from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University for “Imaging Transcription in Living Animals.”

The “Mathematics and Science Partnerships Project: NCLB/Title IIB,” under the direction of Barry Cherkas of Hunter College, has been awarded a $282,436 grant from the New York City Department of Education. Douglas Boyer of Brooklyn College has been awarded $111,106 from the National Science Foundation for research concerning “Primate Dental Topographic and Geometric Morphology.”