CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein To Step Down This Summer

April 12, 2013 | The University

Chancellor Matthew Goldstein announced today in a message to the CUNY community that he intends to step down as Chancellor this summer.

Dr. Goldstein stated: “Serving this exceptional university alongside so many extraordinary colleagues has been the greatest privilege of my professional life. I am deeply grateful to the trustees, members of the chancellery, presidents, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends, who, every day, work so diligently to support and fulfill CUNY’s historic mission. As the first CUNY graduate to lead the University (City College, Class of 1963), I take enormous pride in what we have accomplished, together, to ensure an unparalleled educational experience for every CUNY student.”

A distinguished mathematician and a highly regarded administrator, Matthew Goldstein was appointed Chancellor of The City University of New York in 1999, which today comprises 24 colleges and professional schools throughout New York City. He was previously president of Baruch College/CUNY, president of the CUNY Research Foundation and president of Adelphi University.

Chancellor Matthew Goldstein

Chancellor Matthew Goldstein

Prior to Chancellor Goldstein’s appointment in 1999, a mayoral task force on The City University of New York, chaired by Benno Schmidt, former Yale University president and current CUNY Board Chairperson, issued a blunt report: “The City University of New York: An Institution Adrift.” Among its many recommendations – including the creation of clear standards, assessment methods and accountability policies – the task force pointedly advised: “CUNY must strive to become a unified, coherent, integrated public university system, for the first time in its history.”

Chairman Schmidt said: “Chancellor Goldstein has led the unprecedented transformation of CUNY into the premiere integrated urban university in America. By all indications, CUNY’s outstanding reputation, rising enrollments, increased standards and enhanced resources should be attributed in large measure to his exemplary and courageous leadership. He is profoundly deserving of our deepest admiration and appreciation.”

From the outset, Dr. Goldstein focused on raising CUNY’s academic profile while maintaining its fundamental goals of access and opportunity. This emphasis on high standards, academic rigor and student preparation, including the University’s strengthened partnership with the New York City Department of
Education, has resulted in record enrollments (more than 270,000 degree-seeking students and 220,000 individuals in adult and continuing education), increased graduation rates, and ever increasing numbers of high-achieving students enrolling at CUNY, as demonstrated by the rise in average SAT scores of admitted students and the proliferation of CUNY students winning nationally competitive student awards, including Rhodes, Truman, and Marshall scholarships.

In addition, Dr. Goldstein’s tenure has seen a dramatic increase of more than 2,000 additional full-time faculty members, which has played a major role in strengthening CUNY’s core academic areas. CUNY has also achieved a significant measure of fiscal stability under his leadership through the CUNY Compact, a robust fundraising campaign, and a predictable tuition policy. These policies enable students and their families, as well as the University, to plan more efficiently for the future and gain access to available financial aid, and offer a powerful sign of stakeholder investment in public higher education. In addition, the introduction of University-wide accountability measures ensures consistent review, progress, and efficiency throughout CUNY.

Chancellor Goldstein’s vision also included the creation of new schools and colleges within CUNY, including the William E. Macaulay Honors College, the CUNY School of Professional Studies, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Public Health, and the New Community College, the first in the city in more than 40 years. The Macaulay Honors College, launched in 2001, offers a globally competitive program for some of the most academically talented students in New York. Its innovative curriculum includes four core seminars that link students with the history, arts, and resources of New York City and a “cultural passport” that gives students access to the rich cultural resources the city offers. The college has been a resounding success, with increasingly competitive admissions and graduates who are admitted to the top graduate and professional schools.

Chancellor Goldstein also initiated the creation of the New Community College, which opened in the fall 2012, adding to the system’s six established community colleges. Given the increasing enrollments and relatively low graduation rates at community colleges nationwide, the Chancellor called for a new model to improve student success, with clearly defined pathways to degree completion and a cohesive support structure. The model is based on the University’s successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs) initiative, which graduated 55 percent of community college students in three years, compared to the national average three-year graduation rate of 16 percent for urban two-year colleges.

When Dr. Goldstein was awarded the 2007 Academic Leadership Award from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie’s president, Vartan Gregorian, made clear the reasons for the Chancellor’s recognition. “By raising standards, strengthening student preparation, revolutionizing financing and adding new schools to the system, Matthew Goldstein has truly reinvigorated the City University,” said Gregorian. He added. “Clearly, Matthew Goldstein’s accomplishments prove that excellence in leadership is much more than effective management.”

Chancellor Goldstein began his tenure with a series of bold reforms to elevate CUNY’s academic profile while maintaining its historic mission of access:

 Admission standards for the CUNY senior colleges were raised, and standardized assessment measures were implemented throughout the University.
 A faculty hiring initiative was begun, bringing talented scholars to the University, particularly in response to CUNY programs to strengthen core areas. More than 2,000 new full-time faculty members have been hired since 1999.
 Partnerships with the New York City Department of Education were strengthened in order to enhance student participation in, and preparation for, higher education. Today, CUNY has among the most comprehensive programs of K-12 collaborations of any university in the country.

The introduction of University-wide accountability measures has ensured consistent review of goals, progress and achievements, most notably through the Performance Management Process (PMP), which began in 2000. The PMP builds a set of annual goals for the University from the state-approved Master Plans. Each campus then sets its own annual goals, and its performance is measured against these goals. Performance feedback is provided to the campuses, and outstanding performance is recognized and rewarded. Incentive systems are designed to engage the entire campus community in reaching the PMP goals.

Chancellor Goldstein also emphasized the importance of research and study in the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). In 2005 he launched CUNY’s Decade of Science initiative. The University is increasing student participation and proficiency in STEM disciplines and enhancing its research capacity through an integrated approach: increasing funding to Ph.D. students, upgrading laboratories across campuses, intensifying faculty recruiting efforts, and building and upgrading science facilities, including the new CUNY Advanced Science Research Center.

In order to realize the University’s academic priorities and maintain student access during a time of declining state funding, Chancellor Goldstein developed the “compact” approach to funding. The CUNY Compact is based on a partnership between government and the University that focuses on meeting the University’s operational needs, investing in its academic priorities, and enabling students to plan for the costs of tuition and maintain financial aid. The Compact also emphasizes the importance of philanthropy. In 2004, Chancellor Goldstein launched CUNY’s first University-wide fund-raising campaign, which met its goal of raising $1.2 billion in record time. Today, the campaign is in its second phase and on track to reach $3 billion.

At the Chancellor’s direction, the entire University is currently engaged in the creation of a common curricular structure that will streamline student transfer, enhance the quality of general education across the University and ensure system-wide learning outcomes. The “Pathways to Degree Completion” initiative will bring CUNY more in line with national norms and ensure that students do not exhaust financial aid resources and increase time to degree because of inconsistent transfer and general education policies.

Chancellor Goldstein is nationally recognized for his educational work and has served on the U.S. Teaching Commission and the New York State Commission on Higher Education. He has led two national summits on public higher education, in 2008 and 2010, assembling system leaders from across the country to engage in conversations and make recommendations about the future of public universities.

He is also a civic leader, most recently chairing the 2010 New York City Charter Revision Commission (by appointment of Mayor Michael Bloomberg) and currently serving as chair of the New York City Regional Economic Development Council (by appointment of Governor Andrew Cuomo) and a member of the New NY Education Reform Commission (by appointment of Governor Andrew Cuomo).

Chancellor Goldstein’s Letter to the CUNY Community

April 12, 2013

Dear Members of the CUNY Community:

I write to let you know of my intention to step down as chancellor of The City University of New York early this summer.

Serving this exceptional university alongside so many extraordinary colleagues has been the greatest privilege of my professional life. I am deeply grateful to the trustees, members of the chancellery, presidents, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends, who, every day, work so diligently to support and fulfill CUNY’s historic mission. As the first CUNY graduate to lead the University (City College, Class of 1963), I take enormous pride in what we have accomplished, together, to ensure an unparalleled educational experience for every CUNY student.

Since I began as chancellor in 1999, we have focused on raising the academic profile of the University while maintaining our fundamental goals of access and opportunity. The results of our emphasis on high standards, academic rigor, and student preparation—including our strengthened partnership with the New York City Department of Education—have been record enrollments, increased graduation rates, and more and more high-achieving students coming to CUNY. These students have the benefit of more than 2,000 additional full-time faculty members hired over the last 14 years, whose talents have greatly enhanced our core academic areas.

With the help of the state, the University has also achieved a vital measure of fiscal stability through the CUNY Compact, the initiation of a robust fundraising campaign, and a predictable tuition policy. This enables students and their families to plan more efficiently for the future and gain access to available financial aid, and is a powerful sign of stakeholder investment in our public higher education system. At the same time, University-wide accountability measures have been established to ensure consistent review, progress, and efficiency.

Our priority has always been to provide strong academic opportunities for a wide range of students. That goal has led to the creation of new schools and colleges, including the William E. Macaulay Honors College, the CUNY School of Professional Studies, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Public Health, and the New Community College, the first in the city in more than 40 years. It was also the impetus behind our Decade of Science initiative to increase student proficiency in the STEM disciplines and enhance the University’s research capacity. Most recently, our Pathways to Degree Completion initiative has created a common curricular structure to streamline student transfer, strengthen the quality of general education, and ensure system-wide learning outcomes.

Today CUNY is a transformed institution, re-energized by the creative, dedicated work of professionals across our 24 colleges and professional schools. A CUNY degree is highly valued in the marketplace of careers and ideas. I am extremely proud of the essential role the University plays in the well-being of our city, state, and nation, as well as the continued contributions of our accomplished graduates. Going forward, I know that the University’s mission will only be invigorated by the innovative work and collective efforts of our remarkable CUNY community.

I am working closely with Chairperson Benno Schmidt and the Board of Trustees to ensure a smooth transition with the appointment of an interim chancellor later this spring.

Please accept my heartfelt gratitude for your support and partnership during my tenure as chancellor and your invaluable service to the University. It has been my honor to serve this incomparable institution with you.

Sincerely,

Matthew Goldstein

Chancellor Matthew Goldstein, The City University of New York (CUNY)
List of Accomplishments

• A distinguished mathematician and a highly regarded administrator, Matthew Goldstein was appointed chancellor in 1999. He is the first CUNY graduate (City College of New York) to lead the University, which comprises 24 colleges and professional schools throughout New York City. He was previously president of Baruch College, president of the CUNY Research Foundation, and president of Adelphi University. He has held faculty positions in mathematics and statistics at a number of universities and is the co-author of three books.

• Prior to Chancellor Goldstein’s appointment in 1999, a mayoral task force on The City University of New York, chaired by Benno Schmidt, former Yale University president and current CUNY board chairperson, issued a blunt report: “The City University of New York: An Institution Adrift.” Among its many recommendations—including the creation of clear standards, assessment methods, and accountability policies—the task force pointedly advised: “CUNY must strive to become a unified, coherent, integrated public university system, for the first time in its history.” Under Chancellor Goldstein’s leadership, CUNY, the country’s premier urban institution, is experiencing a widely lauded transformation.

• When Chancellor Goldstein was awarded the 2007 Academic Leadership Award from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie’s president, Vartan Gregorian, made clear the reasons for the chancellor’s recognition. “By raising standards, strengthening student preparation, revolutionizing financing and adding new schools to the system, Matthew Goldstein has truly reinvigorated the City University,” said Gregorian. He added. “Clearly, Matthew Goldstein’s accomplishments prove that excellence in leadership is much more than effective management.”

• Chancellor Goldstein began his tenure with a series of bold reforms to elevate CUNY’s academic profile while maintaining its historic mission of access:
o Admission standards for the CUNY senior colleges were raised, and standardized assessment measures were implemented throughout the University.
o A faculty hiring initiative was begun, bringing talented scholars to the University, particularly in response to CUNY programs to strengthen core areas. Since 1999, more than 1,700 new full-time faculty members have been hired.
o Partnerships with the New York City Department of Education were strengthened in order to enhance student participation in, and preparation for, higher education. Today, CUNY has among the most comprehensive programs of K-12 collaborations of any university in the country.

• University-wide accountability measures were established to ensure consistent review of goals, progress, and achievements, most notably through the Performance Management Process (PMP) in 2000. The PMP builds a set of annual goals for the University from the state-approved Master Plans. Each campus then sets its own annual goals, and its performance is measured against these goals. Performance feedback is provided to the campuses, and outstanding performance is recognized and rewarded. Incentive systems are designed to engage the entire campus community in reaching the PMP goals.

• The result of a University-wide emphasis on high standards and academic rigor has been record enrollments (more than 270,000 degree-seeking students and 220,000 individuals in adult and continuing education), increased graduation rates, and more and more high-achieving students coming to CUNY, as demonstrated by the rise in average SAT scores of admitted students and the proliferation of CUNY students winning nationally competitive student awards, including Rhodes, Truman, and Marshall scholarships.

• Chancellor Goldstein’s vision also included the creation of new schools and colleges within CUNY, including the William E. Macaulay Honors College, the CUNY School of Professional Studies, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, and the CUNY School of Public Health.

• The honors college, launched in 2001, offers a globally competitive program for some of the most academically talented students in New York. Its innovative curriculum includes four core seminars that link students with the history, arts, and resources of New York City and a “cultural passport” that gives students access to the rich cultural resources the city offers. The college has been a resounding success, with increasingly competitive admissions and graduates who are admitted to the top graduate and professional schools.

• Chancellor Goldstein has also emphasized the importance of research and study in the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) through the launch of the Decade of Science initiative, begun in 2005. The University is increasing student participation and proficiency in STEM disciplines and enhancing its research capacity through an integrated approach: increasing funding to Ph.D. students, upgrading laboratories across campuses, intensifying faculty recruiting efforts, and building and upgrading science facilities, including the new CUNY Advanced Science Research Center.

• Most recently, Chancellor Goldstein initiated the creation of a new community college, adding to the system’s six established community colleges. Given the increasing enrollments and relatively low graduation rates at community colleges nationwide, the chancellor called for a new model to improve student success, with clearly defined pathways to degree completion and a cohesive support structure. The model is based on the University’s successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs) initiative, which graduated 55 percent of community college students in three years, compared to the national average three-year graduation rate of 16 percent for urban two-year colleges. The new community college, the first in New York City in more than 40 years, opened in fall 2012.

• In order to realize the University’s academic priorities and maintain student access during a time of declining state funding, Chancellor Goldstein developed the “compact” approach to funding. The CUNY Compact is based on a partnership between government and the University that focuses on meeting the University’s operational needs, investing in its academic priorities, and enabling students to plan for the costs of tuition and maintain financial aid. The compact also emphasizes the importance of philanthropy. In 2004, Chancellor Goldstein launched CUNY’s first University-wide fund-raising campaign, which met its goal of raising $1.2 billion in record time. Today, the campaign is in its second phase and on track to reach $3 billion.

• The CUNY Compact has become the statewide financing model. In 2011, Governor Cuomo and the New York State Legislature approved historic legislation instituting a five-year tuition plan for CUNY and SUNY. The plan includes a maintenance-of-effort provision, ensuring that state funding remains at prior-year levels, as well as the maintenance of financial aid. The policy enables students and their families, as well as the University, to plan more efficiently for the future, and is a strong sign of state investment in public higher education.

• At the chancellor’s direction, the entire University is currently engaged in the creation of a common curricular structure that will streamline student transfer, enhance the quality of general education across the University, and ensure system-wide learning outcomes. The “Pathways to Degree Completion” initiative will bring CUNY more in line with national norms and ensure that students do not exhaust financial aid resources and increase time to degree because of inconsistent transfer and general education policies.

• Chancellor Goldstein is nationally recognized for his educational work and has served on the U.S. Teaching Commission and the New York State Commission on Higher Education. He has led two national summits on public higher education, in 2008 and 2010, assembling system leaders from across the country to engage in conversations and make recommendations about the future of public universities.

• He is also a civic leader, most recently chairing the 2010 New York City Charter Revision Commission (by appointment of Mayor Michael Bloomberg) and currently serving as chair of the New York City Regional Economic Development Council (by appointment of Governor Andrew Cuomo) and a member of the New NY Education Reform Commission (by appointment of Governor Andrew Cuomo).