Professor Jones-Brown Weighs In on Racial Profiling, Stop & Frisk

June 12, 2013 | John Jay College of Criminal Justice

 

Professor Delores Jones-Brown of the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration has kept up a busy spring schedule, with regular media appearances in which she discussed racial profiling and stop-and-frisk practices.

Jones-Brown, the founding director of John Jay’s Center on Race, Crime and Justice, was a guest on May 21 on the National Public Radio program “Tell Me More,” discussing “The Difficulties of Proving Racial Profiling.” The show was hosted by Michael Martin and also featured Professor David Harris of the University of Pittsburgh Law School.

Click here to listen to the interview.

On April 12, she discussed stop-and-frisk practices on Columbia University Radio. She also explored the topic in an appearance on WBAI on April 6, in a featured hosted by Eddie Ellis, a board member of the Center on Race, Crime and Justice.

The May 2013 issue of The Clarion, the Professional Staff Congress newspaper, included an article on CUNY’s involvement with the recently concluded federal civil-rights challenge to the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices. The article — “CUNY and the Stop & Frisk Trial: Faculty and Students at Center of Debate” — focused on the activism of Jones-Brown and a number of John Jay students. Click here to read the story.

Jones-Brown, the 2012 winner of the W.E.B. Dubois Award presented by the Western Society of Criminology, focuses her research and scholarship on race, crime and the administration of justice; police-community relations; juvenile justice, and the legal socialization of adolescent males.  She is the author ofRace, Crime and Punishment (Chelsea House, 2000), and co-editor of The System in Black and White: Exploring the Connections between Race, Crime and Justice (Praeger, 2000) and Policing and Minority Communities: Bridging the Gap (Prentice Hall, 2004).

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/.

For more information, call:

Vivian Todini 212-237-8628

Doreen Viñas-Pineda 212-237-8645