Gold Named Interim Founding Dean of New School of Education

September 10, 2013 | College of Staten Island

Dr. Kenneth Gold

College of Staten Island Interim President Dr. William J. Fritz has named Dr. Kenneth Gold as the Interim Founding Dean of the new School of Education. 

Dr. Gold earned a BA in History from Princeton University, where he graduated cum laude. He then received an MA and PhD in History from the University of Michigan. 

Dr. Gold began his career at the College of Staten Island as an Adjunct Lecturer in 1995. He was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1997 and promoted to Associate Professor in 2002. He teaches courses in the social foundations of education and the history of education, and was a winner of the 2008 Staten Island Excellence in Education Award. Dr. Gold served as Deputy Chairperson of the Education Department (2001-2004), Chairperson of the Education Department (2004, 2007-2010), and most recently as Vice Chair of the College Council (2010-2012). As Chairperson, he oversaw the Education Department’s successful 2010 reaccreditation by the National Council for the Assessment of Teacher Education (NCATE) and initiated the internal discussions that have culminated with the formation of a School of Education. As a member of the Institutional Planning Committee (2006-2013), he served on the steering committee for the College’s most recent Strategic Plan, Many Voices, One Vision

Dr. Gold specializes in the history of urban education in the United States. His research interests include the history of summer education, teacher preparation, and community organizing. More recently, he has explored the history of Staten Island in the 19th and 20th centuries. He has published in the History of Education Quarterly, is the author of School’s In: The History of Summer Education in American Public Schools (2002), and is the co-editor of Discovering Staten Island: A 350th Commemorative History (2011). Dr. Gold is currently completing The Forgotten Borough, a history of Staten Island and its relationship with New York City in the 20th century.