More CUNY Award Winners: CUNY Students Capture Competitive Grants for Graduate Study – National Science Foundation, Fulbright, Soros and More

April 23, 2014 | The University

The National Science Foundation has awarded 17 of its $132,000 Graduate Research Fellowships to students who chose The City University of New York. No public university system in the Northeast has more.

The announcement highlights a spring “awards season” that also includes Fulbright, Luce, Math for America and Soros grants for graduate work, as well as highly competitive Goldwater and Jack Kent Cooke awards for undergraduate study. More CUNY students won prestigious awards in 2014 than ever before.

“With the support of our world-class faculty, CUNY students continue to capture the most prestigious awards, while pursuing graduate research at CUNY and other top universities,” said Interim Chancellor William B. Kelly.

Nine of the National Science Foundation winners are pursuing research in the hard sciences, while eight are in social sciences. The award-winning projects range from basic research into magnetizable photosensitive particles, with hopes of developing super-slim display panels, to refining our understanding of how the mind works through the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, to probing how cities’ approach to rebuilding after war affects residents’ perceptions.
Here are some of CUNY’s award winners:

 

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships

($132,000 for doctoral research)

 

Danya Al-Saleh, now studying cultural anthropology at CUNY Graduate Center (University of California Berkeley, 2013). Her NSF project will examine globalized higher education in Qatar.

Jessica Lynn Allen, now studying plant sciences at CUNY Graduate Center (Eastern Washington University, 2011). Her NSF project looks at lichens.

Bennett T. Callaghan (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 2013), now studying social psychology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His NSF research looks at political participation by people of different socioeconomic and class backgrounds.

Howie Neil Chu (City College of New York, 2013), now studying chemical engineering at University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. His research seeks to increase the power of batteries used in hybrid vehicles.

Rebecca Elisabeth DelliCarpini (Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, 2013), now studying cultural anthropology at University of Texas-San Antonio. She will be heading into Madagascar’s jungles to observe the way that other scientists learn about primates and how they interact with the indigenous people.

Leah Fredman (Lehman College, 2013), now studying social psychology at University of Texas-Austin. In a world in which individuals’ identification with a group can play out heroically or tragically, she intends to probe the way extreme adherence to group identity plays out in Israel.

Elaa Hilou (City College of New York, 2013), now studying chemical engineering at Rice University, is investigating an idea for a new form of video display that would use magnetic fields to control crystalline colloids to create images; this would be more energy efficient and easier on the eye than conventional LED screens.

Ember Kane-Lee (Brooklyn College, 2013), now studying sociology at University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Her research will be an ethnography of women’s experiences on two-gender high school wrestling teams, with an eye toward whether that changes male ideas about females in athletics.

Daniel Jonathan Lurie (City College and CUNY BA, 2014), since graduation a research assistant at the Child Mind Institute in Manhattan, will start a cognitive neuroscience doctoral program at the University of California Berkeley in the fall. His research examines what happens when the mind wanders – which, he says, actually can be the most productive time in cognition.

Jason Martinez (City College of New York, 2013), now studying civil engineering at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, is using his NSF grant to study the way fires travel through buildings.

Aniqua Rahman (City College of New York, 2013), now studying biomedical engineering at Cornell University. In her NSF research, she builds collagen models of cells to better understand how breast cancer metastasizes.

Barukh B. Rohde (Hunter College, 2014), will combine entomology and electrical engineering in NSF-sponsored research at the University of Florida-Gainesville, where as an undergraduate he started his NSF project. It targets the tiny insects that spread the “greening” disease that is causing major damage to the citrus industry.

Mariya Shcheglovitova (City College of New York, 2010), is now studying ecology at George Washington University.

Aliona Tsypes (Hunter College, 2013), now a research assistant at New York Psychiatric Institute, will start Ph.D. research in developmental psychology at SUNY Binghamton this fall. Her NSF project examines how teenagers regulate their emotions – a critical factor in the high rate of suicide in the group.

Reilly Bergin Wilson starts at CUNY Graduate Center this fall. Wilson (Temple University, 2013) postponed her 2013 NSF award to use a Fulbright Fellowship to earn a master’s degree in geography at Leeds University in U.K. Her NSF-sponsored research will examine how children interact with the built environment in a Bosnian city that still shows the scars of war 30 years after the conflict.

Yasmin Zakiniaeiz (Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, 2014) will study neurosciences at Yale University this fall. She intends to examine how brain connections form or break as the result of drug addiction.

Alla Zamarayeva (City College of New York, 2014), a 2013 Goldwater Fellowship recipient, heads to the University of California-Berkeley in the fall. Her NSF research looks at ways of creating batteries that also are structural members of electric vehicles. This would allow more energy to be stored without significantly increasing a vehicle’s weight.

 

Fulbright Fellowships

(federal grants for graduate study vary)

This list may be incomplete, because host countries follow their own schedules for accepting candidates recommended for U.S. Student Fulbright Awards. Award amounts vary by country, but cover expenses including travel, room board and health care; they also may pay for research, tuition and language study expenses.

 

James Blair, CUNY Graduate Center, will research anthropology in the Falkland Islands.

Megan Brown, CUNY Graduate Center, will study France’s decolonization of Algeria in 1962.

William Cheung, Brooklyn College-CUNY BA, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Germany.

Rayya El Zein, CUNY Graduate Center, will research theater in Jordan.

Daniel Friedman, Brooklyn College, in M.F.A. poetry program, will study linguistics in Austria.

Simone Gordon, City College of New York, has an English Teaching Assistantship to India.

Eddie Grinman, Hunter College, will study biology in Japan.

Ariela Hazan,Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Taiwan.

Jonathan Hill, CUNY Graduate Center, will study history in Mexico.

John Horgan, Brooklyn College M.A. in Education Program, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Malaysia.

Alyssa Marchetti, Hunter College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Taiwan.

Chris Martin, Brooklyn College M.A. in Education Program, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Indonesia.

Melody Mills, Macaulay Honors College at Baruch College, will conduct research the education of street girls in Lima, Peru.

Patryk Perkowski, Macaulay Honors College at Queens College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Malaysia.

Zarin Tasnim,  Macaulay at Lehman College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to South Korea.

Karla Padawar Solomon, Macaulay Honors College at Queens College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Spain.

Mariya Tuchinskaya, Macaulay Honors College at Baruch College and CUNY BA, has an English Teaching Assistantship to Bulgaria.

Chloe Weiser, Macaulay Honors College at Queens College, has an English Teaching Assistantship to the Czech Republic.

 

Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans

($90,000 for graduate study)


Robert Fernandez
(York College, 2013) is studying biochemistry, biophysics and structural biology at Yale University.

 


Luce Scholars Program

(15-18 scholars chosen nationally to enhance the understanding of Asia)

 

Audrey Stienon (Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, 2014).

 

Math for America Fellowships

($100,000 stipend plus CUNY master’s for future NYC public school math teachers)

 

Andre Braddy (Medgar Evers College, 2014)

Matthew De Andrade (Queens College, 2014)

Iskander Kapkayev (Macaulay at Brooklyn College, 2014).

Danny Ramos (Hunter College, 2014)

 

 

W. Burghardt Turner Fellowship

($100,000 for graduate studies at SUNY Stony Brook)

 

Chantal Adlam (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 2014), to pursue doctorate in organic and analytical chemistry. She eventually intends to seek out medicinal plants in undeveloped regions of the world.

 

Jack Kent Cooke Transfer Scholarships

(up to $30,000 a year for two or three years for community college students to pursue baccalaureate degrees)

 

 

Peishan (K.C.) Chen (Kingsborough Community College, 2014) intends to become a forensic chemist; accepted to Smith College and SUNY Stony Brook, and is waiting to hear from other colleges.

Yueting Chen (Queensborough Community College, 2014) is a junior in biochemistry at SUNY Stony Brook.

Rachel Lazar (Kingsborough Community College, 2014) intends to become a psychologist or psychiatrist; she has been accepted at Fordam University and is waiting to hear from other colleges.

Cristina Mihailescu (LaGuardia Community College, 2014) will study economics, with an eye toward finding global solutions to global problems; she has been accepted at Baruch College and is waiting to hear from other colleges.

 

Barry Goldwater Scholarships

(highly competitive 1- and 2-year federal grants for undergraduate study of up to $7,500 a year)

 

Lauren Blachorsky, Macaulay Honors College at Queens College.

Nicola Gabrielle Kriefall, Hunter College.

 

About The City University of New York:
The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in New York City in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY School of Public Health.   The University serves more than 270,000 degree-credit students and 218,083 adult, continuing and professional education students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 300 high schools throughout the five boroughs of New York City. The University offers online baccalaureate degrees through the School of Professional Studies and an individualized baccalaureate through the CUNY Baccalaureate Degree. Nearly 3 million unique visitors and 10 million page views are served each month via www.cuny.edu, the University’s website.