Audio

AUDIO: Louis Armstrong’s Bountiful Later Years

October 30, 2011 | Audio, The University

The author of a critically acclaimed new book, What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong’s Later Years, insists that although much has been written about the early and middle stages of Armstrong’s career, he was every bit as busy and creative in the last 25 years of his life. “There was only one Armstrong,” says Ricky Riccardi, who is also the project archivist for the Louis Armstrong House Museum research archive at Queens College. “The man who was making those canonical works in the 1920s was also a very funny man who loved doing pop songs, and, in the 1950s and ’60s still played an incredible trumpet,” adds Riccardi, “So why not take all of him.”

AUDIO: The Beauty of Falling Water

October 26, 2011 | Audio, The University

Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece, “Fallingwater,” originally was conceived as a vacation home in the woods, with views of a nearby waterfall — a plan Wright soon scrapped after seeing the natural beauty of the place. Wright wanted the Kaufmann family “to live with the waterfall — not just look at it,” said Robert McCarter, author of several books on Wright, at City College’s Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Lecture Series. McCarter, a professor of architecture at Washington State University, says Wright “wanted it to be an integral part of their lives.”

AUDIO: Gulf War Vets’ Time to File for Ailments Ends Soon

October 24, 2011 | Audio, The University

Veterans who served during the Persian Gulf War (1990-91) have until Dec. 31, 2011, to file claims for “undiagnosed illnesses.” Ben Weisbroth, former deputy director of the New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs and this week’s Veterans Corner guest, advises veterans who are suffering from a variety of ailments, including chronic fatigue syndrome, joint […]

AUDIO: Macaulay Author Series: Julie Otsuka

October 20, 2011 | Audio, The University

Soon after World War I, many young Japanese women arrived in California as mail-order brides, seeking to better their lives. But future husbands were often a disappointment, or worse. “On the boat, they could not have known that the photographs they had been sent were often 20 years old and that the letters that had been written to them were by professionals whose job it was to tell lies and win hearts,” says Julie Otsuka, author of The Buddha in the Attic. At an event at Macaulay Honors College featuring Knopf Doubleday authors, Otsuka read from her latest novel, which tells the often heartbreaking stories of what became of these women and their families.

SEEK Renamed in Honor of Percy Sutton

October 14, 2011 | Audio, The University

The City University of New York has celebrated the renaming of its landmark SEEK program to honor Percy E. Sutton, a prominent African-American political and business leader, civil-rights activist and lawyer who served as Manhattan Borough President from 1966 to 1977 and died in 2009.

AUDIO: Returning Vets, There’s Money for College

October 5, 2011 | Audio, The University

Returning veterans often face tough financial hurdles that prevent them from applying to college, but Ann Little, veterans’ advocate at the College of Staten Island Student Veteran Center, says the Post-9/11 GI Bill can help. It pays college costs and provides monthly living expenses as well — a major benefit in a rough economy. “Go back to school would be my No. 1 advice to any veteran,” Little says.

AUDIO: Louis Armstrong’s Bountiful Later Years

October 5, 2011 | Audio, The University

The author of a critically acclaimed new book, What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong’s Later Years, insists that although much has been written about the early and middle stages of Armstrong’s career, he was every bit as busy and creative in the last 25 years of his life. “There was only one Armstrong,” says Ricky Riccardi, who is also the project archivist for the Louis Armstrong House Museum research archive at Queens College. “The man who was making those canonical works in the 1920s was also a very funny man who loved doing pop songs, and, in the 1950s and ’60s still played an incredible trumpet,” adds Riccardi, “So why not take all of him.”
Listen Now >>