Science Wire

CCNY Team Defines New Biodiversity Metric

August 28, 2014 | City College

To understand how the repeated climatic shifts over the last 120,000 years may have influenced today’s patterns of genetic diversity, a team of researchers led by City College of New York biologist Dr. Ana Carnaval developed a new biodiversity metric called “phylogeographic endemism.”

City Tech Students Take First Place in International Design Competition in Shanghai, China

August 28, 2014 | New York City College of Technology

This spring, City Tech students Eugene Babkin, Bijan Mokhtari, and Angjelo Kuka won first place in the regional Digilent Design competition hosted by City Tech. With that win they earned the opportunity to compete in the Digilent Design Worldwide Contest in Shanghai, China, where they again took first place against strong international competition earlier this […]

CCNY Researchers Receive $5 Million in Federal Grants

August 26, 2014 | City College

More than $5 million in federal research grants has been awarded to four City College of New York researchers in the interdisciplinary CUNY Institute for Macromolecular Assemblies.

CCNY Study Redefines Ecological Model

August 26, 2014 | City College

In a study that could alter traditional notions in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology, three City College of New York researchers present results indicating that competition between two species can lead to the geographic isolation of one of them. The finding by biologists Eliecer E. Gutiérrez, Robert A. Boria and Robert P. Anderson is the cover story in the August issue of the Swedish-published journal “Ecography” under the title, “Can biotic interactions cause allopatry? Niche models, competition, and distributions of South American mouse opossums.”

New research shows temperatures vary block by block

August 26, 2014 | The University

This summer has seen the temperature rise above the severe heat mark of 90 degrees just five times, with the latest happening Wednesday afternoon. That’s far fewer times than in an average New York summer.

Medgar Evers College Set to Reopen Campus Library

August 26, 2014 | Medgar Evers College

Medgar Evers College is pleased to announce the planned reopening of the Charles Evans Innis Memorial Library. The Library space has been closed since late 2012 for a $22 million dollar refurbishment and is now set to again open its doors to students, faculty and staff on September 15th, 2014.

Professor Carla Barrett Discusses Juveniles Offenders in Riker’s Island on NY1’s Inside City Hall

August 26, 2014 | John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Professor Carla Barrett appeared on NY1’s “Inside City Hall” to discuss the treatment of teenage inmates on Riker’s Island and ways to improve the current state of juvenile justice. A recent report by the United States Attorney in Manhattan found the New York City Department of Correction violated the civil rights of male teenagers at […]

Study redefines ecological model: Competition among species can cause geographical isolation

August 25, 2014 | The University

In a study that could alter traditional notions in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology, three City College of New York researchers present results indicating that competition between two species can lead to the geographic isolation of one of them. The finding by biologists Eliecer E. Gutiérrez, Robert A. Boria and Robert P. Anderson is the cover story in the August issue of the Swedish-published journal “Ecography” under the title, “Can biotic interactions cause allopatry? Niche models, competition, and distributions of South American mouse opossums.”

Study at Deepwater Horizon spill site finds key to tracking pollutants

August 18, 2014 | The University

A new study of the ocean circulation patterns at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill reveals the significant role small-scale ocean currents play in the spread of pollutants. The findings provide new information to help predict the movements of oil and other pollutants in the ocean.

Workshops Work

August 17, 2014 | The University

A growing number of states have begun to require community colleges to allow more students with academic deficiencies to skip remediation and enroll directly in college-level courses. New research shows this approach can work, particularly if those students receive additional academic support.

Distinguished Professor Isaac Goldemberg The “Times And Roots” Retrospective And A National Recognition

August 13, 2014 | Hostos Community College

Distinguished Professor Isaac Goldemberg is enjoying the splash of attention and venerated respect he has worked hard to earn in the last 40 years as author, novelist, poet, essayist, and chronicler of his Jewish-Peruvian heritage and history. The House of Peruvian Literature in Lima, Peru is presently exhibiting a retrospective in honor of his work […]

Hostos Secures New York State Grants To Expand And Improve Its Allied Health And Media Programs

August 6, 2014 | Hostos Community College

On July 25, 2014, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of CUNY will receive two grants as part of his CUNY 2020 initiative—$2.2 million for “Allied Health Training for Employment” and a portion of the $4.6 million allocated for a new multi-campus media program. Through this initiative, the Governor […]

Hostos Secures Two Large State Grants To Expand And Improve Allied Health And Media Programs

July 31, 2014 | Hostos Community College

On July 25, 2014, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that Hostos Community College would receive two grants—$2.2 million for an “Allied Health Training for Employment” initiative and part of $4.6 million for a new multi-campus media program— as part of Governor Cuomo’s CUNY 2020 initiative. The Governor’s initiative awarded eight highly competitive grants totaling $55 […]

Four CCNY PhD Students Awarded U.S. DoE Fellowships

July 30, 2014 | City College

Four PhD students at The City College of New York have been awarded Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) Fellowships for excellence by the U.S. Department of Education (DoE). The fellows, who will receive need-based support including a stipend of up to $30,000 annually from the second year of their respective programs, are:

Jared Bass (molecular, cellular and developmental biology)
Jose Cobo (biochemistry)
Silas Hartley (biochemistry)
Alicia Sponholz (molecular, cellular and developmental biology)

Brainwaves Can Predict Audience Reaction

July 30, 2014 | City College

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at The City College of New York, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong predictor.

Scientists and Students Will Work around the Clock to Discover Animals, Plants, and Other Species during Macaulay Honors College BioBlitz at The New York Botanical Garden

July 30, 2014 | Macaulay Honors College

Students from Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York will team up with noted scientists to discover and catalog a richly varied array of animals, plants, fungi, and even microbes. The BioBlitz team descends on The New York Botanical Garden for 24 hours on September 6 and 7, 2014.

The Graduate Center Wins Grant to Establish New Data Visualization Center

July 30, 2014 | CUNY Graduate Center

As coleader of CUNY’s Big Data Consortium, which has won a $15 million grant from the State of New York in the CUNY 2020 competition, the Graduate Center will establish the CUNY Center for Digital Scholarship and Data Visualization.

Secrets of the Octopus

July 27, 2014 | The University

Have you ever wondered why the mighty eight-armed octopus never gets tangled up in knots? In a surprising discovery that revealed some of the secrets of the octopus, Brooklyn College psychology professor Frank W. Grasso and researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem found that a chemical repellent in octopus skin prevents the arms from grabbing each other.

The tiny nautilus may help illuminate the history of brain development

July 27, 2014 | The University

Unlike most other soft-bodied cephalopods — cuttlefish, squid and octopus — the nautilus has no camouflage, no ink and relatively poor vision

For-profit home care agencies cost Medicare billions extra, yet provide worse care: Health Affairs study

July 27, 2014 | The University

For-profit home health agencies are far costlier for Medicare than nonprofit agencies, according to a nationwide study published today [Monday, Aug. 4] in the August issue of the journal Health Affairs. Overall cost per patient was $1,215 higher at for-profits, with operating costs accounting for $752 of the difference and excess profits for $463. Yet the quality of care was actually worse at for-profit agencies, and more of their patients required repeat hospitalizations.