News from The City University of New York

Fighting pollution critical to fight against diseases of poverty

July 30, 2015 | The University

This fall, the international community will gather in New York City at the United Nations to officially endorse a game plan, called the Sustainable Development Goals, aimed at reducing poverty and inequity over the next 15 years.

Rare Nautilus Spotted for First Time in 30 Years

July 30, 2015 | The University

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn’t seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers one of the world’s rarest animals, a remote encounter that may become even more infrequent if illegal fishing practices continue.

Octopuses seen throwing things may be using shells as weapons

July 30, 2015 | The University

Octopuses have been recorded gathering up armfuls of debris – and remember, they have eight arms – before taking pot shots at one another. Whether it’s a case of “get off my turf” or merely “oops, didn’t mean to hit you” is still a puzzle.

It’s Shockingly Common for New Yorkers to Blow Through Red Lights

July 30, 2015 | The University

If you stand at the corner of 50th Street and 7th Avenue, in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, you might notice something disturbing. At this heavily traveled intersection, swarming with people on foot, a lot of drivers aren’t obeying the most fundamental rule of the road: stopping when the light turns red.

Earliest baboon found at Malapa

July 30, 2015 | The University

A team from Wits University’s Evolutionary Studies Institute has discovered a fossil monkey specimen representing the earliest baboon ever found.

Higher-Tech Fake Eggs Offer Better Clues To Wild-Bird Behavior

July 30, 2015 | The University

Since the 1960s, biologists have made fake eggs for some studies of bird behavior. But Mark Hauber of Hunter College in New York says this kind of scientific handicraft is not exactly his forte.

A Piece of the Earliest Baboon Ever Found

July 30, 2015 | The University

A two-million-year-old skull fragment comes from the earliest baboon ever found, a new study reports. The fossil was found in Malapa, a cave in South Africa and a Unesco World Heritage site where specimens of Australopithecus sediba, an early ancestor of modern humans, werediscovered in 2010.

To Pluto and Beyond: Planetarium Show Wows Space Fans

July 30, 2015 | The University

The first-ever flyby of Pluto left scientists and the public wide-eyed, and the surprises will likely keep on coming.

The shark that glows in the dark

July 30, 2015 | The University

Swell sharks generally keep a low profile, squeezing between rocky crevices to keep out of the way of predators.

New evidence suggests marmosets learn vocalizations from parents

July 30, 2015 | The University

A team of researchers with Princeton University has found that marmosets appear to learn at least some of their vocalizations from their parents. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes a study they carried out with the little South American monkeys and what they learned from it. David Margoliash with the University of Chicago and Ofer Tchernichovski with City University of New York offer some insight into the work done by the team in a Perspectives piece in the same journal edition.

Science Assures It’s Fine to Have Fewer Friends in Your 30s

July 30, 2015 | The University

Social networks tend to follow predictable cycles throughout a person’s life, expanding in the 20s and shrinking in the 30s and beyond, a notion borne out by social-scienceresearch and popular trend pieces alike. Now, a new study takes this idea and fast-forwards several decades into the future, giving a hint about the long-term impact of this friendly ebb and flow.

Study Finds Sun Belt Population Growth and Warming Climate Could Quadruple Exposure to Extreme Heat

July 30, 2015 | The University

A valuable study published this week in Nature Climate Change projects that exposure to extreme heat in the United States is likely to rise enormously by mid century, driven equally by demographic shifts boosting Sun Belt populations and projected changes in heat waves in a warming climate.

How friendship affects well-being in each decade of life

July 30, 2015 | The University

Eighteen months ago, Chad Every moved from Ohio to St. Petersburg, Florida. He had a new job, apartment and bicycle, but one important ingredient of a good life was missing: friends.

Every was content at first to spend time reading and relaxing alone, but the self-proclaimed extrovert knew he’d eventually need pals for impromptu trips to coffee shops, movie theaters and concerts.

“I finally reached a point when I knew I needed to put myself out there. A (vinyl) record fair was happening by my house, so I literally went with the hope of finding a friend,” said Every, 26.

Millennials Are Very Mixed Up About Sex

July 30, 2015 | The University

“Each generation thinks it invented sex,” science fiction author Robert Heinlein famously claimed.

Once again, CCNY is named one of America’s Top Colleges by Forbes

July 29, 2015 | City College

The City College of New York rose significantly in Forbes magazine’s 2015 rankings of America’s Top Colleges, landing in the top 100 in the Northeast for the second consecutive year. CCNY also ranked in the top 200 overall for the first time.