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CUNY Law School to Move: Service to Asian and Other Underserved Communities Will Be Strengthened

July 20, 2011

On June 30, 2011, New York State Assembly Member Grace Meng, New York City Council Member Peter Koo, and Flushing Chinese Business Association Executive Director Peter Tu toured 2 Court Square, the future home of the City University of New York School of Law, and spoke about what the school’s move will mean for Asian and other underserved communities.

Photo (l-r): New York State Assembly Member Grace Meng, Dean Michelle Anderson, New York City Council Member Peter Koo, Executive Director of the Flushing Chinese Business Association Peter Tu, and Adjunct Professor Dr. Albert Kit-Wai Chan inside the first floor of 2 Court Square in Long Island City.

Photo (l-r): New York State Assembly Member Grace Meng, Dean Michelle Anderson, New York City Council Member Peter Koo, Executive Director of the Flushing Chinese Business Association Peter Tu, and Adjunct Professor Dr. Albert Kit-Wai Chan inside the first floor of 2 Court Square in Long Island City. More photos below.

“As a law school dedicated to public interest, CUNY Law is a great asset to our community, offering pro bono legal assistance through its clinic and supporting new lawyers who are eager to devote themselves to practice law for social justices,” said Assemblywoman Grace Meng, whose district includes Flushing. “The school’s move to Long Island City will allow even more people to access these critical services.”

In May 2012, the CUNY School of Law plans to move from its current location in Flushing into the first six floors of 2 Court Square. The building, which is LEED Gold certified and was designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, will provide 225,000 square feet of space for larger classrooms, an auditorium, and a moot courtroom. The new Long Island City location will also be accessible by more than a dozen subway and bus lines and the LIRR.

“The new location will enhance our ability to serve the Queens community and to carry out our public interest mission,” noted Dean Michelle J. Anderson. “We look forward to continuing our work with the diverse communities of Queens, including the Asian community.”

Lian Kuang, a CUNY School of Law 2009 alumna who also spoke at the press conference, spoke about her work at CUNY Law on legal issues affecting the Asian community. An attorney at Ronald Fatoullah and Associates where she works on elder law issues, Kuang’s dream of bringing greater cultural competency to the bar and working with the Chinese elderly community was realized when she was selected for the prestigious Borchard Fellowship in Law & Aging, one of just two law graduates nationwide to receive the honor.

As CUNY Law’s first Borchard Fellow, she provided advice or direct representation to more than 50 elders and their caregivers in matters such as advanced care planning, government benefits, and guardianship. In addition, she wrote the pamphlet Important Legal Documents to Have in New York in English and Chinese. To educate the bar, she wrote Guide to Presenting to Chinese Elders on Advance Directives. “It’s critical that we provide culturally competent legal services,” said Kuang. “CUNY Law trains this kind of lawyer.” For Fatoullah, Kuang will be reaching out to the Asian community to offer comprehensive legal services.

Founded in 1983, the CUNY School of Law trains lawyers committed to serve the underprivileged and disempowered and was recently named the top public interest law school in the nation by PreLaw magazine.

The Law School’s current building at 65-21 Main Street will be used by Queens College after the move.

Contact: Abbi Leman, 718-340-4472, abbi.leman@mail.law.cuny.edu

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09) with journalists. Kuang, who was CUNY Law's first Borchard Fellow in Law & Aging, is an attorney at Ronald Fatoullah and Associates where she works on elder law issues. She spoke about her work on legal issues affecting the Asian community.

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09) with journalists. Kuang, who was CUNY Law's first Borchard Fellow in Law & Aging, is an attorney at Ronald Fatoullah and Associates where she works on elder law issues. She spoke about her work on legal issues affecting the Asian community.

(l-r): Adjunct Professor Jack Chung ('01), CUNY Law Foundation Board Member Kathy Huang, Dean Michelle Anderson, and Peter Tu at 2 Court Square.

(l-r): Adjunct Professor Jack Chung ('01), CUNY Law Foundation Board Member Kathy Huang, Dean Michelle Anderson, and Peter Tu at 2 Court Square.

(l-r): Jack Chung ('01), Peter Tu, Assembly Member Grace Meng, and Council Member Peter Koo.

(l-r): Jack Chung ('01), Peter Tu, Assembly Member Grace Meng, and Council Member Peter Koo.

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09) and Fred Rooney ('86), director of CUNY Law's Community Legal Resource Network.

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09) and Fred Rooney ('86), director of CUNY Law's Community Legal Resource Network.

(l-r): Jack Chung ('01), Peter Tu, Assembly Member Grace Meng, and Council Member Peter Koo.

(l-r): Jack Chung ('01), Peter Tu, Assembly Member Grace Meng, and Council Member Peter Koo.

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09), Peter Tu, Council Member Peter Koo, Assembly Member Grace Meng, Dean Michelle Anderson, Dr. Albert Kit-Wai Chan, and Jack Chung ('01).

(l-r): Lian Kuang ('09), Peter Tu, Council Member Peter Koo, Assembly Member Grace Meng, Dean Michelle Anderson, Dr. Albert Kit-Wai Chan, and Jack Chung ('01).

 

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