Podcasts

Archive for 2009

Greenland Rocks, for Geologists

November 6, 2009 | Newsmakers, Queens College

It’s not for everyone, but the rugged mountains of eastern Greenland turned out to be the ideal summer spot for a team of geologists. “Unlike the Himalayas, which is crawling with geologists, Greenland is relatively less explored so there’s a lot to be discovered,” said Hannes Bruckner, professor at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Queens College. “Also, the glaciers cleared away the cover on the rocks and it’s too cold for vegetation, so it has splendid exposure.” Under a National Science Foundation grant, Prof. Brueckner, his undergraduate college assistant Richard Bubbico, and colleagues from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and University of California at Santa Barbara, spent two weeks exploring the formation — roughly 400 million years ago — of Liverpool Land, part of the North Atlantic Caledonides.

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Boulevard of Dreams

November 3, 2009 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

Constance Rosenblum’s latest book, “Boulevard of Dreams: Heady Times, Heartbreak and Hope Along the Grand Concourse in the Bronx”, is a valentine to the neighborhoods around the Grand Concourse, whose distinctive Art Deco buildings were a sought-after address for upwardly mobile families during the first half of the 20th century. A long-time editor of The New York Times City Section, who currently writes the Habitats column for the Sunday real estate section, Rosenblum chronicles the evolution of this iconic boulevard, modeled after the Avenue Champs-Elysees by its French-born engineer Louis Risse, up to its decline in the 1960s. “To talk about what it had been and then what became of it, in subsequent years, seems to be the perfect metaphor to speak about urban change,” Rosenblum said in an book talk at the CUNY Graduate Center.
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Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs

November 3, 2009 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Student Affairs and Special Programs, Monday, November 2, 2009.
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Committee on Academic Policy, Programs and Research

November 3, 2009 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Academic Policy, Programs and Research, Monday, November 2, 2009.
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Committee on Facilities Planning and Management

November 3, 2009 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings, Facilities Planning, Construction and Management

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Facilities Planning and Management, Monday, November 2, 2009.
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Committee on Fiscal Affairs

November 3, 2009 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Fiscal Affairs, Monday, November 2, 2009.
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Afghanistan: Fault Lines and Resistance

October 26, 2009 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

An Afghan activist representing a Kabul-based human rights organization has a harsh message for the U.S. and its allies. “Afghanistan is a free country, but only for rapists,” said “Zoya,” who uses a pseudonym and won’t be videotaped or photographed. “It’s free for the drug lords who have made the country the largest producer of opium, for the warlords to commit any kind of crime without the least concern, and for foreign troops to kill our civilians.” “Zoya” spoke on behalf of the Revolutionary Association of Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) on a panel that examined the escalating conflicts in Afghanistan as the U.S. enters its eighth year of intervention. She was joined at the Graduate Center event by Nation columnist Jeremy Scahill, Bill Fletcher, Jr., executive editor of The Black Commentator, and Adaner Usmani of Action for Progressive Pakistan (APP).
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Secularism, Islam and Liberty of Conscience

October 26, 2009 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center, Newsmakers

Is there such a thing as a secular state? How can we find a way to mediate between religion and politics? In a conversation about the meaning of secularism and Islam today, moderated by John Torpey, professor of sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center, Abdullahi Ahmed An-Naim and Patrick Weil tackle these and other controversial and relevant questions. A professor of law at Emory University and author of the recently published Islam and the Secular State, An-Naim joins Weil, a visiting professor of Yale University School of Law from the University of Paris, in a discussion at the Graduate Center. “It is equally important to separate religion from the state as to acknowledge, regulate, and organize the connectedness of religion and politics,” says An-Naim. Weil agrees, while pointing out the difficulties in achieving that. “The secular state has to ensure the freedom of consciousness for the majority of the population–and it’s not always easy to find a way to ensure that freedom.”
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Invest in New York's Brightest

October 23, 2009 | The Chancellor's Report

Since its inception in in 2001, the William E. Macaulay Honors College has become one of the largest and most innovative programs of its kind in the country. At a breakfast event held at the college entitled, “Stepping Up for New York’s Brightest: How Public Education Prepares Our City’s Best Students,” Chancellors Matthew Goldstein and Joel Klein spoke to guests about the importance of investing in programs like Macaulay in order to stay competitive in tomorrow’s marketplace. “We are now thinking forward about an economy that’s being transformed very quickly from a manufacturing economy to one that is going to be driven by highly skilled and knowledge-based decision making,” said Chancellor Goldstein. “The only way we’re going to compete is if we train our students at the highest levels that we are capable of training them.”
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Culture and Crisis in the Great Depression

October 22, 2009 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

One of America’s bleakest chapters produced some of the 20th century’s most enduring cultural images, says critic Morris Dickstein. In his latest book, “Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression,” Dickstein, distinguished professor of English at the CUNY Graduate Center, writes about this 1930s paradox. “The arts provided a powerful psychological stimulus,” he said, referring to the iconic film classics “The Wizard of Oz” and “It’s a Wonderful Life.” “They injected a potent dose of imaginative energy into a period or relative stagnation and inactivity.” In a discussion moderated by jazz critic Gary Giddins at the Graduate Center, “Making Sense of Hard Times: Cultural and Crisis in the Great Depression,” Dickstein joined fellow panelists including film critic Molly Haskell and author Peter Conn.
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