Podcasts

Archive for 2010

Committee on Academic Policy, Program and Research

November 2, 2010 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Academic Policy, Program and Research, Monday, November 1, 2010.
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Committee on Fiscal Affairs

November 2, 2010 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Fiscal Affairs, Monday, November 1, 2010.
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Committee on Facilities, Planning and Management

November 2, 2010 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Facilities, Planning and Management, Monday, November 1, 2010.
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A Journey Along the Real Nile

November 2, 2010 | CUNY Lecture Series

Traveling the Nile the way people of the region really do, and not like a modern, well-equipped expedition member, was important to author Dan Morrison, who recounted his 4,000-mile trek from Lake Victoria to the Mediterranean Sea in a Graduate Center event sponsored by CUNY Baccalaureate Degree. Morrison, an CUNY Baccalaureate alumnus and author of the new book, “The Black Nile: One Man’s Amazing Journey Through Peace and War on the World’s Longest River,” says the idea was to make the trip not with “expensive boats or an ultralight aircraft, as others have done…but to use only local conveyances. My interest was in what has become of those lands in the post-post-colonial era.”
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Fewer School Cooks, More Student Pounds

October 26, 2010 | Hunter College, Newsmakers

Sharp budget cuts to the National School Lunch Program in the 1980s contributed to our current epidemic of overweight and obese children, according to Hunter College sociologist Janet Poppendieck. “They cut labor and replaced school cooks with bulk convenience foods — the precooked, defrost and reheat pizzas and chicken nuggets,” says Poppendieck, author of “Free For All: Fixing School Food in America,” adding that unhealthy food choices were part of the wider culture, as well. “In the 80s, people saw taking their kids to fast food restaurants as a treat and increasingly these were the foods that young people wanted.”
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Haiti’s Troubled Refugee Camps

October 25, 2010 | Newsmakers, York College

Some 1.5 million displaced Haitians remain in wretched and hazardous conditions – 20 percent without clean water and 30 percent without any kind of toilet – nearly a year after an earthquake leveled the capital. Mark Schuller, an assistant professor of African American studies and anthropology at York College and a visiting professor at the State University of Haiti, recently released a report, “Unstable Foundations: Impact of NGOs on Human Rights for Port-au-Prince’s Internally Displaced People,” based on a summer of onsite observation. The recent cholera outbreak that killed more than 300 Haitians deaths and hospitalized nearly 5,000, comes as no surprise. “Given the poor health and sanitation on the ground, they were totally unprepared for a cholera outbreak,” Schuller said.
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Subcommittee on Investment

October 21, 2010 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Subcommittee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Subcommittee on Investment, Wednesday, October 20, 2010.
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Greenland’s Hottest Year Ever

October 13, 2010 | City College, CUNY Lecture Series

With its massive — and melting — ice sheets, Greenland is the ideal laboratory for scientists studying the effects of global warming, says Marco Tedesco, assistant professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the City College of New York. This summer, scientists recorded Greenland’s hottest year ever, a “spectacular, catastrophic year in the arctic,” according to Tedesco, who spoke on “Glacial Meltdown and the Impact of Global Warming,” at the University’s Serving Science lecture series. “Since we started observing Greenland, using satellites in 1979, there’s been a strong increase in both melting and surface temperature,” he says.
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Big Boost for Small Campaign Donors

October 13, 2010 | Baruch College, CUNY Lecture Series

More people are contributing to political campaigns since the rate of public funds that match their contributions was increased in 2007, according to Amy Loprest, executive director of the New York City Campaign Finance Board. The effect has been significant, says Loprest, who was part of a panel entitled, “Small Donors, Big Democracy: The Impact of Campaign Finance Regulation on Citizen Partnership,” sponsored by Baruch College School of Public Affairs. “In 2009 there were 34,000 new donors,” Loprest says, “that’s more than half of all the donors.” When the CFB was started two decades ago, one goal was to reduce the influence of big money in elections, and “the purpose of giving matching funds was to make smaller contributors feel that their contributions meant something,” says Loprest.
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Digital vs. Print: New York Magazine’s Adam Moss

October 7, 2010 | CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY Lecture Series

New York magazine’s print edition still has the edge over its Web site, nymag.com, in generating revenue, but its editor, Adam Moss, says that will change in a few years. “That’s not to say we’re giving up on print,” says Moss in a conversation with Stephen Shepard, founding dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. “We love print, but it seems like the print part will be a flagship of the brand — the economic power of the business will come from the digital side.” Moss, who previously was editor of the New York Times Magazine, answered questions and mused about the future of journalism in the ever-evolving media landscape.
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