Podcasts

Archive for 2014

Committee on Facilities, Planning and Management

September 9, 2014 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings, Facilities Planning, Construction and Management

Standing committee meeting of the Board of Trustees, Committee on Facilities, Planning and Management, September 8, 2014.

Public meeting of the Board of Trustees

September 9, 2014 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Public meeting of the Board of Trustees, September 8, 2014.

Nixon’s Legacy Strapped in Tape

September 3, 2014 | CUNY Lecture Series

“We now know he probably should have burned” all the tapes. “It would have looked better,” says author Douglas Brinkley, referring to the recordings President Richard M. Nixon had made in his White House years. Speaking at Hunter College’s Roosevelt House, the best-selling author of The Nixon Tapes, 1971-72, which includes the largest set of tape transcriptions yet published, says the president “thought they would have huge historical value,” outweighing any concerns for secrecy. The tapes played a pivotal role in his downfall, and the transcripts provide additional insight into both the president’s paranoia and his flawed political genius.

Voices of Black America

August 7, 2014 | Book Beat

In this impressive collection, Bartlett’s Familiar Black Quotations, City College professor Retha Powers documents the words and lyrics of legendary African-American voices from Malcolm X to Maya Angelou. Powers discusses her eight-year research project in compiling the book and her hope in educating young people on black written and oral tradition.

Foraging for Food — and Love

July 8, 2014 | Book Beat

While exploring Brooklyn backyards and New York City parks for edible plants, Ava Chin, associate professor of English at the College of Staten Island, reveals how foraging helped heal family wounds and mended a broken heart. Chin’s new memoir, Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal, weaves together lessons on finding nature, forgiveness and love in the most unexpected places.

Food, Art and Connections

July 7, 2014 | Book Beat

Would you like to know the recipe for Frida Kahlo’s Red Snapper? Or maybe you might prefer baking David Hockney’s strawberry cake? In her new work, The Modern Art Cookbook, Mary Ann Caws, a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, English and French at the CUNY Graduate Center, explores the delicious connection between art and literature and food.

Chancellor’s Report to the Board of Trustees

June 30, 2014 | The Chancellor's Report

Completing his first month of service, Chancellor James B. Milliken thanked the CUNY Board of Trustees for “the honor and opportunity” to serve and discussed plans to visit every college campus by the end of summer. Chancellor Milliken reported on the new funding within the recently approved city budget for merit-based scholarships sought by the University Student Senate, restorations for CUNY Prep, and $1.5 million to CUNY’s Professional Development Institute to train pre-kindergarten teachers. Milliken detailed the $67 million in new appropriations included in the recently approved state budget and noted that 22 students and 14 faculty were awarded Fulbright Scholarships to study and work abroad.

Public meeting of the Board of Trustees

June 30, 2014 | Board of Trustees Meetings & Public Hearings

Public meeting of the Board of Trustees, June 30, 2014.

Making the Case for Marriage Equality

June 20, 2014 | CUNY Lecture Series, Hunter College

Former U.S. Solicitor General Theodore B. Olson and litigator David Boies were once bitter rivals, arguing against each other before the Supreme Court in Gore v. Bush. Years later, the pair formed a legal odd couple thatbrought them back to the Supreme Court, this time on the same side arguing against California’s Proposition 8, which banned same sex marriage. The rivals turned allies are co-authors of Redeeming the Dream: The Case for Marriage Equality, in which they recall their five-year struggle that culminated in a landmark decision overturning Proposition 8 in the 2013 case of Hollingsworth v. Perry. Speaking at the Roosevelt House at Hunter College, the attorneys make an emotional case for marriage equality as well as the legal one. “Marriage is between two people that love one another that want to form a lasting, stable, permanent, eternal relationship with one another who want to become part of the community,” Olson says, “who want to raise their children in a community and who want to be a part of the economy and be part of everything that America stands for.”

The Scottsboro Boys’ Ordeal

June 18, 2014 | Book Beat

Few cases, if any, in American legal history can equal the injustice and racism suffered by the nine black teenagers who were falsely accused and wrongly convicted in Scottsboro, Ala., in 1931. In his book, The Scottsboro Boys in Their Own Words: Selected Letters, 1931-1950, Kwando Kinshasa, professor of sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, examines how the boys were arrested and charged with raping two white girls on a freight train and found guilty by an all-white jury. By using their own words, the letters present an original and authentic representation of their nearly two decades of incarceration, as well as a forceful expression of their struggle to maintain a sense of dignity and hope.