Podcasts

CUNY Lecture Series

Roger, Rodgers and the Book on Broadway

July 9, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

Award-winning Broadway producer Roger Berlind credits legendary composer Richard Rodgers for encouraging him to follow his own theatrical path. “He was my idol,” says Berlind, who traveled with Rodgers as an assistant producer before striking out on his own in a career spanning more than 30 years. Berlind, whose current production of “The Book of Mormon” is his 15th Tony award winner, appeared at “On Producing: Broadway’s Roger Berlind,” an event moderated by Mara Isaacs and sponsored by the Segal Center at the Graduate Center.

Never Mind Illegal, It’s Wrong

June 13, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

When it comes to reducing gang-related crime violence, ethics can often be a more effective tool than traditional law enforcement, according to criminologist David Kennedy. “In a place where people don’t believe in the law, calling something ‘wrong’ is much more powerful than calling it illegal,” says Kennedy, who directs the Center for Crime Prevention and Control at John Jay College. As part of the Symposium Series at the college, Kennedy, in a lecture “Gangs and Crime: Reduction Strategies,” discusses his groundbreaking work that brings gang members together with community members, social services representatives and law enforcement officials, to help bring “domestic tranquility” to high-crime communities.

Les Payne: Journalism’s Role in Democracy

June 12, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, Issues in Journalism, LaGuardia Community College

In the early 1970s, as the number of heroin addicts in New York City started to explode, the Long Island newspaper Newsday sent a team of investigative reporters to find the source of the scourge. “That’s how journalism works,” says Les Payne, about his work on “The Heroin Trail,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning series that uncovered an international ring of heroin smugglers. You find a problem, see no quick answers, so you begin to investigate, says Payne, who wrote a column for Newsday until retiring in 2008. Payne spoke with students at LaGuardia Community College about the invaluable role that investigative reporting plays in a healthy democracy.

Election Perspectives 2012

May 8, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center, Issues in Journalism

“An embarrassment and an affront to the American people,” is how Time political correspondent Joe Klein describes the field of Republican candidates in the 2012 presidential primary race. Longtime Washington and New York journalist and author of the novel Primary Colors, Klein joined Ben Smith of Politico and Peter Beinart of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism to discuss perspectives on the 2012 election.

E.L. Doctorow: Don’t Call It ‘Historical’

May 1, 2012 | CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY Lecture Series

Well-known for his best-selling works, often described as historical fiction, the author of Ragtime and Billy Bathgate resists the labeling of his writing. “There is something diminishing about the word ‘historical’ as applied to a novel,” says E.L. Doctorow, who spoke at the fourth annual Leon Levy Conference at the Graduate Center. “A work relegated to a genre, somehow feels less relevant than the here and now,” says Doctorow, the award-winning author of 11 novels, who delivered the conference lecture, “Biography in Fiction.”

As Voting Builds Up, So Does the Backlash

April 12, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series

Since the November 2010 elections, more than a dozen states have passed legislation requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls. Republicans argue it helps protect against voter fraud, but according to Dale Ho, assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Fund, these tactics have been tried in the past. “This ‘new’ assault on voting rights in the 21st century is nothing new,” said Dale at a labor forum sponsored by CUNY’s Murphy Institute titled, “Who Gets to Vote? The 2012 Election & Voting Rights Restrictions.”

Peter Gelb: Even the Opera Demands Change

April 9, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

When Peter Gelb took the helm of the Metropolitan Opera, he was determined to re-energize America’s premier opera house, even at the risk of upsetting the establishment. “It’s a mistake for any cultural institution — or any institution that is older — to think that change isn’t necessary,” said Geld to an audience at the CUNY Graduate Center. “That’s a recipe for stagnation or demise.” Since being named general manager in 2006, Gelb has launched a number of initiatives including staging new productions by directors from the film and theater industries and the popular, live high-definition transmissions of broadcasts to movie theaters. Gelb appeared with Bill Kelly, president of the Graduate Center, as part of the Extraordinary Lives Series.

Mercury Rising — and Rising

April 8, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Mercury — a complex environmental pollutant — is still on the rise. Indeed, it’s the only pollutant in the U.S. and around the globe for which advisories continue to increase, according to Anthony Carpi, professor of environmental toxicology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. When Mercury from natural or manmade causes, such coal-fired plants, leaves the atmosphere it “undergoes this hopscotching effect,” says Carpi, who recently led a team of researchers through the Amazon to study mercury mobility, “where a source in China could impact water resources in northern Canada.” The winner of the 2011 U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring, Capri’s talk focused on mercury levels in the Amazon, as part of the Serving Science Cafe lecture series.

Kennedy and the Spirit of Churchill

March 29, 2012 | Book Beat, CUNY Lecture Series, Hunter College

The author of Churchill Defiant: Fighting On, 1945-1955, claims that the British prime minister’s influence on John F. Kenney’s intellectual thinking and political strategies is indisputable. “I don’t think Jack Kennedy would have been half the man he was if it wasn’t for Winston Churchill,” says Barbara Leaming, the author of Jack Kennedy: The Education of a Statesman (2006), in which she detailed her research. Leaming, who spoke at the Tina Santi Flaherty Irish Voices Literary Series at Hunter College, discussed how Kennedy “looked to his idol for inspiration, in almost all his decisions, including the (1963 Limited Nuclear) Test Ban Treaty which put an end to the Cold War.”

Real Mad Men Could ‘Think Small’

March 28, 2012 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center

Before advertising’s creative revolution in the late 1950s and 60s, the TV commercial landscape was filled with dull, repetitive images — like dancing cigarettes — lacking wit and originality. “People were bored and sick of the jingles,” says Andrew Cracknell, author of The Real Mad Men: The Remarkable True Story of Madison Avenue’s Golden Age. “After the revolution they began to treat consumers with intelligence and give them something with substance,” referring to work by agencies such as Doyle Dane Berbach, who created the groundbreaking “Think Small” campaign for Volkswagon in 1959. At a Graduate Center event, Cracknell was joined by Barbara Lippert, former advertising critic for Adweek, and Amil Gargano, advertising executive and a founder of the agency, Ally & Gargano, to discuss how these real life “Mad” men and women inspired others in the industry.