Podcasts

Newsmakers

Policing Protests: White-Collar Work

October 5, 2011 | Brooklyn College, Newsmakers

The Occupy Wall Street protests, which began on September 17, have shown some distinctive policing strategies, according to Alex Vitale, a Brooklyn College associate professor in sociology who specializes in police response to demonstrations. One thing “has been the use of supervisors — so-called white shirts, lieutenants and up — to do a lot of the arrests and be kind of a front line of interaction, rather than having patrol officers do it,” said Vitale, in an interview at the center of the protests in Zuccotti Park in Manhattan’s financial district. “I think, in part, it’s an attempt to avoid the overuse of force and escalation of conflicts but, unfortunately, some of those supervisors have made mistakes and have escalated the conflict.”
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ASAP Initiative Praised

September 28, 2011 | Newsmakers

A report by Complete College America, a nonprofit group financed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation cited CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) for helping graduate more community college students more quickly. Chancellor Matthew Goldstein recently discussed the ASAP at a national conference on community colleges hosted by CUNY. “The cost per student may be more than the traditional model, but the cost of a graduate is less,” said Goldstein.
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Camonghne Felix: Poetry Team for Hostos

September 22, 2011 | Newsmakers

Poet Camonghne Felix, a sophomore at Hostos Community College, was named “New York City Youth Poet of the Year” in 2010 by the famed Nuyorican Poets Cafe. Ka’mone (her pen name) is now organizing a Hostos slam team for the national competition in the College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational in California, in April 2012. It would be the first time a CUNY slam team would participate in the CUPSI, says Camonghne and “would represent some of the greatness we have on our campuses.”
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500 Pedestrians Injured in City Bike Accidents Annually

September 21, 2011 | Hunter College, Newsmakers

A report by two Hunter College professors, William Milczarski and Peter Tuckel, found that 1,000 pedestrians are hospitalized every year after colliding with bicyclists statewide – and more than 500 of those injured are in New York City. “We were surprised just by the sheer number,” said Milczarski, who discussed the study and its potential impact on the bike-share program which is scheduled to launch next summer. “More bike lanes are going to continue to happen and the bike-sharing plan is going to happen because more people want to bike,” added Milczarski, “But what we need is more education on how to cycle safely.”
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Olympian Power to the People

September 6, 2011 | City College, Newsmakers

Like Zeus, the supreme god of the Olympians in Greek mythology, people will some day be able to control their own destiny, according to theoretical physicist, Michio Kaku. “Zeus could simply think about things and have them come to be; we will have that power,” says Kaku, co-founder of the strong field theory and physics professor at City College. In an interview at his office, Kaku discussed his latest book, “Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100,” and predicts a future where humans will be able to communicate with computers mentally and have access to the Internet via contact lenses.
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Volunteer Voices: 50 Years of the Peace Corps

August 11, 2011 | New York City College of Technology, Newsmakers

More than 200,000 Americans have volunteered for the Peace Corps since its inception in 1961, and for many of them it was a life-changing experience. “We really became more open, more interesting, and always better people than before we went,” says Aaron Barlow, an assistant professor of English at New York City College of Technology and editor of a new collection of essays entitled, “One Hand Does Not Catch a Buffalo: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories.” Barlow, who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Togo from 1988 to 1990, explained how his own experience mirrored other stories featured in the book. “We thought we were going to help all these people — the truth is, we helped ourselves.”
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Commencement Speakers Across the University Urge Graduates To Fight Injustice

June 20, 2011 | John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Newsmakers, William Macaulay Honors College at CUNY

CUNY’s class of 2011 celebrated their achievements at commencement events held across the City. Playwright Tony Kushner, attorney and activist Lynn Paltrow, essayist and The New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik, educator Geoffrey Canada and former New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein were among the distinguished speakers who challenged this year’s graduates to achieve and challenge wrong despite overwhelming resistance.
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W&W Joins ‘Say No’ to Violence Campaign

June 15, 2011 | Newsmakers, Queens College

Six out of every ten females worldwide will experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, according to the United Nations’ UNITE to End Violence Against Women campaign. “Violence against women and girls is not a women’s issue — it’s everybody’s issue,” says Carmella Marrone, founding director of Women and Work (W&W), a free, 15-week life-skills program for women in need and based at the Queens College Extension Center. In April, W&W earned membership in the UNITE to End Violence’s “Say No” campaign, which will enable the organization to expand its educational and outreach efforts even further. “The work we do locally now has a global face,” says Marrone.
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Assessing the Census

May 16, 2011 | Newsmakers

Andrew Beveridge, professor of sociology at Queens College, says the U.S. Census can be summed up in two words: power and money. Beveridge, who has conducted demographic analyses for the New York Times since 1993, explained how updated census figures can shape legislative districts and affect federal funding to state and local governments. “That’s why Bloomberg is so upset,” said Beveridge-referring to the lower than expected population growth rate in the 2010 census, ”because it directly affects the money coming into New York City.” Listen Now >>

Fukushima and the One Hundred Year Storm

April 27, 2011 | City College, Newsmakers

Japan’s devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami were unavoidable forces of nature, but the nuclear meltdown that resulted was man made, according to Michio Kaku. “If you take a look at Fukushima, there have been previous tsunamis that have hit the exact same area,” says Kaku, professor of theoretical physics at City College, referring to the area about 140 miles north of Tokyo where the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was built. In an interview, Kaku pointed out that engineers tend to study incidents that take place in their own lifespan, not long term. “When it comes to nuclear power, we have to look at the 100-year storm.”
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