Podcasts

Newsmakers

Olympian Power to the People

September 6, 2011 | City College, Newsmakers

Like Zeus, the supreme god of the Olympians in Greek mythology, people will some day be able to control their own destiny, according to theoretical physicist, Michio Kaku. “Zeus could simply think about things and have them come to be; we will have that power,” says Kaku, co-founder of the strong field theory and physics professor at City College. In an interview at his office, Kaku discussed his latest book, “Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100,” and predicts a future where humans will be able to communicate with computers mentally and have access to the Internet via contact lenses.
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Volunteer Voices: 50 Years of the Peace Corps

August 11, 2011 | New York City College of Technology, Newsmakers

More than 200,000 Americans have volunteered for the Peace Corps since its inception in 1961, and for many of them it was a life-changing experience. “We really became more open, more interesting, and always better people than before we went,” says Aaron Barlow, an assistant professor of English at New York City College of Technology and editor of a new collection of essays entitled, “One Hand Does Not Catch a Buffalo: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories.” Barlow, who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Togo from 1988 to 1990, explained how his own experience mirrored other stories featured in the book. “We thought we were going to help all these people — the truth is, we helped ourselves.”
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Commencement Speakers Across the University Urge Graduates To Fight Injustice

June 20, 2011 | John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Newsmakers, William Macaulay Honors College at CUNY

CUNY’s class of 2011 celebrated their achievements at commencement events held across the City. Playwright Tony Kushner, attorney and activist Lynn Paltrow, essayist and The New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik, educator Geoffrey Canada and former New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein were among the distinguished speakers who challenged this year’s graduates to achieve and challenge wrong despite overwhelming resistance.
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W&W Joins ‘Say No’ to Violence Campaign

June 15, 2011 | Newsmakers, Queens College

Six out of every ten females worldwide will experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, according to the United Nations’ UNITE to End Violence Against Women campaign. “Violence against women and girls is not a women’s issue — it’s everybody’s issue,” says Carmella Marrone, founding director of Women and Work (W&W), a free, 15-week life-skills program for women in need and based at the Queens College Extension Center. In April, W&W earned membership in the UNITE to End Violence’s “Say No” campaign, which will enable the organization to expand its educational and outreach efforts even further. “The work we do locally now has a global face,” says Marrone.
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Assessing the Census

May 16, 2011 | Newsmakers

Andrew Beveridge, professor of sociology at Queens College, says the U.S. Census can be summed up in two words: power and money. Beveridge, who has conducted demographic analyses for the New York Times since 1993, explained how updated census figures can shape legislative districts and affect federal funding to state and local governments. “That’s why Bloomberg is so upset,” said Beveridge-referring to the lower than expected population growth rate in the 2010 census, ”because it directly affects the money coming into New York City.” Listen Now >>

Fukushima and the One Hundred Year Storm

April 27, 2011 | City College, Newsmakers

Japan’s devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami were unavoidable forces of nature, but the nuclear meltdown that resulted was man made, according to Michio Kaku. “If you take a look at Fukushima, there have been previous tsunamis that have hit the exact same area,” says Kaku, professor of theoretical physics at City College, referring to the area about 140 miles north of Tokyo where the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was built. In an interview, Kaku pointed out that engineers tend to study incidents that take place in their own lifespan, not long term. “When it comes to nuclear power, we have to look at the 100-year storm.”
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Krugman and the Rabbit Hole of Economics

April 21, 2011 | CUNY Lecture Series, Graduate Center, Newsmakers

In today’s topsy-turvy world, what used to make sound, economic sense is no longer the case, according to Paul Krugman, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics and a New York Times columnist. “We are in Bizzaro-land now. Both consumer and government saving depresses the economy because the money isn’t being spent at businesses that will spur investment,” says Krugman, who appeared at the Graduate Center as part of the series, “Perspectives: Conversations on Policy and Place with Peter Beinart,” to discuss the Obama’s administration’s missteps, failed policies in other countries and a reluctance, across the board, to accept responsibility. “If people had actually listened to economists,” says Krugman, “then the profession deserves a lot of the blame.”
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An Evening with New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller

April 20, 2011 | CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY Lecture Series, Newsmakers

What Bill Keller, executive editor of New York Times, still enjoys, most, about journalism is what attracted him to it in the late 1960’s when he wrote for the Pomona College student newspaper. “The things I’ve always always found most satisfying about journalism was the exploratory function-wading into a big, puzzling situation and than explaining it in a way that people might fund find really engaging,” said Keller, who was at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, in an event sponsored by the New York Press Club and moderated by WNYC’s “On The Media” managing editor and host, Brooke Gladstone. Keller spoke about a wide range of issues, including the new online pay model, as well as the rewards of the job. “My favorite reaction, when people respond to a story, isn’t, gee, I didn’t know that, but, gee, I never thought of it that way-and editing the paper is a lot like that.”
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White House Honors for John Jay Professor

March 18, 2011 | John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Newsmakers

In a White House ceremony earlier this year, Anthony Carpi, professor of Environmental Toxicology at John Jay College, was recognized with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring — the most prestigious honor in his field. “It was an absolute thrill to see the program that we had initiated become so effective and to be recognized on a national level,” says Carpi, who was nominated by the college and selected by the National Science Foundation for his work in creating PRISM. The undergraduate research initiative creates opportunities for forensic science students to engage in faculty-mentored research projects. It was also gratifying, Capri says, “to meet the president, who has been so involved with science and education.”
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A Rhodes Scholar’s Dream to Help

February 16, 2011 | Brooklyn College, Newsmakers, William Macaulay Honors College at CUNY

For 2011 Rhodes Scholar Zujaja Tauqeer, the dream of becoming a doctor — like both her parents — was instilled in her and her older sister at a very young age. “We had to finish our education and become doctors, and nothing has changed except that we’re in a different country,” says Tauqeer, a senior, studying medicine and history at Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College. As victims of religious persecution in Pakistan, the family was granted asylum in the U.S. in 1998, eventually settling in Staten Island. Tauqeer, who is the seventh student in CUNY’s history to win a Rhodes Scholarship, plans to attend the University of Oxford in England this fall and hopes to return someday to her native Pakistan. “I’d like to work there to improve social stability through medicine.”
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