News & Events

ASRC Update: The ASRC Cleanroom Facility

January 22, 2014 | Announcements, Flagship Research, News, Research

Construction progress continues on the CUNY Clean Room shown above

Construction progress continues on the CUNY Clean Room shown above

The ASRC cleanroom is a state-of-the-art facility for interdisciplinary research in nanoscience and applied nanotechnology. The cleanroom offers a comprehensive set of tools to help researchers develop new micro- and nanoscale devices, such as integrated circuits, advanced sensors, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and microfluidic systems. The cleanroom is also equipped to support nanotechnology research that spans several science and engineering fields, allowing advances in areas as diverse as nanophotonics, condensed matter physics, and biomedical device engineering.

The cleanroom will be a 4,271 sq. ft. cleanroom with additional lab space for back-end processing and support.  The ASRC is set to open in fall 2014 and the cleanroom will offer one of the most advanced of its kind in the greater New York City area. The cleanroom and its equipment will be open to all qualified users, welcoming researchers from industry and other academic institutions.

Dr. Jacob Trevino has been working to ensure the Clean Room is well equipped.

Dr. Jacob Trevino has been working to ensure the Clean Room is well equipped.

Dr. Jacob Trevino, the new Scientific cleanroom Director, joined the ASRC team in September 2013. Prior to his arrival at CUNY, Dr. Trevino worked as a Senior Process Engineer in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) industry. In his most recent position at Analog Devices Inc., he utilized cutting edge micro- and nano-fabrication techniques to bring new inertial MEMS products into high-volume manufacturing. He has also worked in the area of MEMS foundry process development, collaborating with several universities and companies to bring their designs to realization.

Dr. Trevino’s academic research focuses on nanophotonics.  His doctoral research involved the design of complex nanostructures for enhanced light-matter interactions in planar optical devices. Specifically, his worked targeted the enhancement of light emitting diodes (LEDs), thin-film solar cells, bio-sensors, and optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM).

Dr. Trevino earned a B.S. in Physics and B.A. in Mathematics from Susquehanna University, a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Boston University.