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C-SURP Spotlight: Anastasiia Sergiienko, Hunter College

January 22, 2014 | Announcements, News, Research, Student Resources

Anastasiia Sergiienko presents her project’s poster The effect of Thermal Annealing on Structures of Diamond -Like Carbon.

Anastasiia Sergiienko presents her project’s poster The effect of Thermal Annealing on Structures of Diamond -Like Carbon.

Anastasiia Sergiienko knew from a young age that she wanted to study physics, but at the technical university she attended in the Ukraine, Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, this option was not available to her. Instead, she studied power engineering with a specialization in alternative energies. Since the fall of 2012, she has been pursuing a second Bachelor’s degree in physics at Hunter College.

While at Hunter, Anastasiia has actively sought opportunities to conduct hands-on research and found out about the C-SURP program in one of her classes. During her research experience, Anastasiia worked in Dr. Steve Greenbaum’s lab at Hunter College on a project that is a collaboration with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of Pennsylvania.  She studied the effect of thermal annealing on the structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond-like carbon is a material that has numerous potential applications as a durable and low‐friction coating. Some of these applications require that the DLC function at very high temperatures, and indeed, these materials were tested on one of the last Space Shuttle flights. Therefore, it is extremely important to study whether the heating process results in structural changes at the atomic level. Anastasiia used electron paramagnetic resonance methods to detect structural defects in the DLC as a function of annealing temperature.

Steve Greenbaum was so pleased with Anastasiia’s work during the C-SURP program that he invited her to spend her senior year as a member of his research group. Anastasiia plans to graduate in May 2014 and to continue her research on alternative sources of energy in graduate school and in her career.