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Hunter Professor Awarded NIH Grant to Study Adolescent Suicide Ideation

April 4, 2017 | Faculty, Funding, News

Dr. Regina Miranda, Professor of Psychology at Hunter College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), and Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Youth Cognition and Suicide at Hunter College, has been awarded a Support of Competitive Research Advancement Award from the National Institutes of Health (totaling $1.56 million over 4 years), to conduct a longitudinal study examining suicide ideation among adolescents recruited from two New York City hospitals.

Knowing how to assess suicide ideation in a way that helps clinicians know whether an adolescent is at short-term risk of making a future suicide attempt is important in preventing the transition from suicidal thought to suicidal behavior. This research will examine whether and how two distinct subtypes of suicide ideation may help to identify whether teenagers who present for clinical care are likely to attempt suicide in the near future. Given that clinicians often have limited time to assess risk, knowing which forms of suicidal thinking merit attention may improve clinical triage decisions. Furthermore, understanding the cognitions underlying different types of suicidal thought may also inform psychotherapy interventions with adolescents who report suicide ideation.

“Dr. Miranda has been on the cutting edge in contributing to our understanding of suicidal ideation,” says Dr. David Shaffer, Philips Professor of Pediatric Psychiatry at Columbia University and one of Dr. Miranda’s collaborators. “She has been ahead of the game in making the focus of adolescent suicide research on understanding the characteristics of ideation without centering on attempt behavior.” Dr. Sandra Runes, Director of Psychology at NYC Health + Hospitals/Lincoln, one of the study’s collaborating sites, states, “Lincoln Medical Center, in the South Bronx, is repeatedly confronted with the high incidence of suicidal ideation amongst adolescents. We feel strongly that this research will be most valuable in helping to understand and identify those teens who are most at risk for suicidal behaviors.”

Dr. Miranda’s research team and lab include Research Associate Dr. Ana Ortin Peralta, Project Coordinator Jhovelis Mañaná, trainees from the Ph.D. Program in Health Psychology and Clinical Science at The CUNY Graduate Center, and students from Hunter College. (For more information about the Laboratory for the Study of Youth Cognition and Suicide, please visit http://www.mirandalab.org).

Contact Dr. Regina Miranda at regina.miranda@hunter.cuny.edu for more information.