Archive for 2013

Abraham Briloff, Accounting Professor, Dies at 96

December 20, 2013 | Faculty

Abraham J. Briloff, an accounting expert whose trenchant and sometimes scathing analyses of corporate financial records often sent investors scurrying to dump their stocks, died on Thursday at his home in Great Neck, N.Y. He was 96.

Jock Young, 1942-2013

December 16, 2013 | Faculty

William “Jock” Young was born in Midlothian on 4 March 1942 and educated in Aldershot before studying sociology at the London School of Economics from 1962. He began teaching at what is now Middlesex University in 1968 and remained there for 35 years, for much of it as director of the Centre for Criminology. In 2002 he moved to the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. He later served as professor of sociology at the University of Kent and then returned to New York as distinguished professor of criminal justice and sociology at CUNY’s Graduate Center.

Al Ruscio, Character Actor and Acting Teacher, Dies at 89

November 15, 2013 | Faculty

Al Ruscio, a film, television and stage actor who was also a noted acting teacher and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild, died in his home on Nov. 12. He was 89.

Leonard Herzenberg, 81, Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies

November 15, 2013 | Students

Leonard Herzenberg was in his lab at Stanford University one day in the early 1960s, laboriously counting cells under a microscope. His eyes hurt. “There’s got to be some kind of machine that can do this,” he remembered muttering.

He went on to develop precisely that — and in doing so helped revolutionize immunology, facilitate stem cell research and advance the treatment of cancer, H.I.V. infection and other illnesses.

Dr. Herzenberg, who died on Oct. 27 at 81 in Stanford, Calif., created a device that can pick out individual cells from a mass of trillions of them and then capture, sort and count them so they can be analyzed and used to fight disease.

Tato Laviera, 63, Poet of Nuyorican School

November 7, 2013 | Students

Tato Laviera lost his sight, but not his vision. His acclaimed poems and plays captured the rhythms and language of Puerto Rico and the Lower East Side — his twin loves — with equal measures of protest, playfulness and hope.

A Yiddishe Momme of Music, Chana Mlotek, Dies at 91

November 7, 2013 | Alumni

Chana Mlotek, an impassioned sleuth and archivist of Yiddish music whose song collections allowed thousands to imbibe the mirthful and mournful melodies of the shtetl, ghetto and Yiddish theater, died on Monday at her home in the Bronx. She was 91.

Major Owens, 77, Education Advocate in Congress, Dies

October 29, 2013 | Faculty

Major R. Owens, a former librarian who went to Congress from Brooklyn and remained there for 24 years, fighting for more federal aid for education and other liberal causes, died on Monday in Manhattan. He was 77.

Oscar Hijuelos, Who Won Pulitzer for Tale of Cuban-American Life, Dies at 62

October 15, 2013 | Alumni

Oscar Hijuelos, a Cuban-American novelist who wrote about the lives of immigrants adapting to a new culture and became the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for his 1989 book, “The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love,” died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 62.

Jean Anyon Dies at 72; Wrote ‘Ghetto Schooling’

October 2, 2013 | Faculty

Professor Anyon, who died on Sept. 7 at 72, was one of the first people to study that landscape in detail — and among the first to assert that without accompanying social reforms like job creation, antipoverty initiatives and urban renewal, the problems of education in urban, poor areas would never be surmounted.

Stephen Crohn, Who Furthered AIDS Study, Dies at 66

September 25, 2013 | Alumni

Beginning in 1978, Stephen Crohn cared for Jerry Green, a handsome gymnast, as he lost 30 pounds, went blind and was ravaged by the kinds of infections that rarely harmed otherwise healthy people.