Students

William Greaves, a Documentarian and Pioneering Journalist, Dies at 87

August 28, 2014 | Students

William Greaves, a producer and director who helped bring an African-American perspective to mainstream America as a host of the groundbreaking television news program “Black Journal” and as a documentary filmmaker, died on Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 87.

Obituary: Claire Tow, 83, cable co. founder, philanthropist

August 12, 2014 | Students

Claire Tow, 83, died peacefully on Monday, July 7, at Norwalk Hospital with her loving family by her side after a 14-year struggle with Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS).

Billy Joel’s Mother, 1978 Song’s Namesake, Dies

July 16, 2014 | Students

Billy Joel’s mother, who inspired him to write “Rosalinda’s Eyes,” has died in New York at age 92.

Paul Mazursky Dies at 84; Director Showed ‘Me’ Era’s Strength and Foibles

July 3, 2014 | Alumni, Students

Paul Mazursky, an innovative director and screenwriter who both satirized and sympathized with America’s panorama of social upheavals in the late 1960s and ’70s in films that included “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” “Blume in Love” and “An Unmarried Woman,” died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 84.

Arthur Gelb, Critic and Editor Who Shaped The Times, Dies at 90

May 22, 2014 | Students

Arthur Gelb, who by sheer force of personality was a dominant figure at The New York Times for decades, lifting its metropolitan and arts coverage to new heights and helping to shape the paper in its modern era, died on Tuesday at his home in Manhattan. He was 90.

Boris Magasanik, 94; pioneer in molecular biology at MIT

March 10, 2014 | Students

A pioneering scientist in the emerging field of molecular biology, Boris Magasanik made key discoveries and spent 50 years teaching generations of Massachusetts Institute of Technology students about the secrets of tiny cells.

Bill Adler, Writer, Editor and Compiler of Books, Dies at 84

March 4, 2014 | Students

Bill Adler, who pursued his goal of being the P. T. Barnum of books by conceptualizing, writing, editing, compiling and hustling hundreds of them — prompting one magazine to anoint him “the most fevered mind” in publishing” — died last Friday in Manhattan. He was 84.

Theodore Millon, a Student of Personality, Dies at 85

February 3, 2014 | Alumni, Students

Theodore Millon, a psychologist whose theories helped define how scientists think about personality and its disorders, and who developed a widely used measure to analyze character traits, died on Wednesday at his home in Greenville Township, N.Y. He was 85.

Herbert L. Haber, 89, Dies; Negotiated in Era of Strikes

January 28, 2014 | Students

Herbert L. Haber, the chief labor negotiator for the City of New York from 1966 to 1973, when strikes by transit workers, firefighters, the police, teachers and garbage collectors tested the balance of power between the city and its municipal unions, died on Jan. 20 in Auburndale, Mass. He was 89.

Leonard Herzenberg, 81, Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies

November 15, 2013 | Students

Leonard Herzenberg was in his lab at Stanford University one day in the early 1960s, laboriously counting cells under a microscope. His eyes hurt. “There’s got to be some kind of machine that can do this,” he remembered muttering.

He went on to develop precisely that — and in doing so helped revolutionize immunology, facilitate stem cell research and advance the treatment of cancer, H.I.V. infection and other illnesses.

Dr. Herzenberg, who died on Oct. 27 at 81 in Stanford, Calif., created a device that can pick out individual cells from a mass of trillions of them and then capture, sort and count them so they can be analyzed and used to fight disease.