Home

The Constitution and Suffrage

Jefferson and the Election of 1800

Contested Elections and the
    Electoral College

America at Mid-Century

Civil War

Reconstruction

Women’s Suffrage

Women Get the Vote

Jim Crow

A New Deal for Workers

Big City Voting

Native Americans and Chinese
    Get the Vote

Civil Rights

The Promised Land

Puerto Rican Voters

New Voices

Mexican American Voters



Welcome From the Chancellor

continued
student voter registration system. Jay asked Dr. Richard K. Lieberman, Director of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College -- which has for twenty-five years produced many exemplary calendars and lesson plans covering a variety of topics, including the lives of former New York City Mayors, the history of the New York City Council and the origins of public housing -- to lead the Calendar's development. With the enthusiastic endorsement of LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow, Dr. Lieberman along with Dr. Steven A. Levine, Education Coordinator at the Archives, began working this past winter with colleagues on gathering documents, photographs, and sketches. An Advisory Committee of prominent educators at The City University of New York was established, including award-winning historians, political scientists, sociologists, senior administrators, directors of major institutes and centers, technology experts and students (see Acknowledgments). Members assisted with both editing and the identification of source materials. Quotes from CUNY student leaders are included explaining what democracy means to them.

Building on our ongoing partnership with colleagues at The New York Times Knowledge Network, in particular Vice President of Marketing Services Alyse Myers, College Marketing Manager Felice Nudelman, Corporate Sponsorships Manager, Newspaper in Education, Stephanie Doba, and Group Director of Community Affairs and Media Relations Diane McNulty, a formal collaboration was established to make the Calendar widely accessible and to facilitate the curricular elements. The New York Times Archives contributed photographs.

I am especially grateful to the founding sponsors of the project: TIAA-CREF, led by Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer Herbert M. Allison, Jr. and JPMorgan Chase, led by Chairman and CEO William Harrison, Jr. for their special support of and generous assistance with the project. The Calendar will be translated, with the help of the Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños at Hunter College, in Spanish and in additional languages in the months ahead.

I would also like to thank Mayor Michael Bloomberg, City Council Speaker Gifford Miller, Queens Borough President Helen Marshall and Vice President Thomas Newell of the Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Their historic support and funding of the La Guardia and Wagner Archives and its calendars and curricula has helped the Archives to preserve history and make it available and accessible to the public.

The Calendar project very much benefited from the assistance of Louise Mirrer, President of the New-York Historical Society, both to help launch the project at a City-wide reception and to provide curricula guidance. Partnerships with civic and community leaders will assure the widespread availability of the Calendar. This comprehensive website, developed by Michael Arena, CUNY Director of Media Relations, has been established, featuring both the Calendar and links to related resources and informational materials.

Our democracy is safeguarded and strengthened when all of its members have access to knowledge of our history and culture. This combined publication of the Calendar, website, and curriculum will reach millions of people in New York City, across the country and around the world. It is profoundly consistent with The City University's mission to educate all the people, "the whole people" -- rooted firmly in the tradition of the original Free Academy established in 1847, which became The City College of New York. It will create a common thread for readers to understand how suffrage began as a privilege for the few and then became a right for all citizens. Most importantly, we hope to emphasize the importance of the exercise of those rights through the electoral process so that voices can be heard and every vote can be counted.



Matthew Goldstein
Chancellor





In The Spotlight:


Investing in Futures: Public Higher Education in America
Let Freedom Ring Curriculum
City Life
Let Freedom Ring
A Nation of Immigrants
A Nation of Immigrants Curriculum
Voting Curriculum
Women's Leadership in
American History

Women's Leadership Curriculum


Milestones
Photo Gallery
Listen/Look
Student Quotes
Citizenship Info
Voting Info Links
Acknowledgements
Contact Us