Publications (Peer-Reviewed)

*NEW* CUNY Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP): Evidence from Six Cohorts and Lessons for Expansion, Proceedings of the 12th Annual National Symposium on Student Retention (2016) [pdf]

Improving Student Outcomes via Comprehensive Supports: Three-Year Outcomes From CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), Community College Review (2013) [pdf]

Moving the Completion Needle at Community Colleges: CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning (2013) [pdf]

Reports and Working Papers

Results Thus Far and the Road Ahead: A Follow-Up Report on CUNY Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), January 2012 [pdf]

Early Outcomes Report for City University of New York (CUNY) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), November 2009 [pdf]

Evaluation Briefs

Download the full brief: Six-Year Outcomes of ASAP Students: Transfer and Degree Attainment

Summary

This evaluation brief presents six-year academic outcomes for Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) and matched comparison group students. The brief explores whether ASAP’s previously demonstrated effect on associate degree attainment remained over time, and whether ASAP students transferred to baccalaureate programs and earned bachelor’s degrees at higher rates. Data were analyzed for the first two ASAP cohorts, those who entered in fall 2007 and fall 2009, and effects were estimated only for students who entered ASAP as first-time freshmen. The findings indicate that, six years after entering college, ASAP students continued to perform better than comparison group students across all measures, including associate degree attainment, transfer to baccalaureate programs, bachelor’s degree attainment and any undergraduate degree attainment. In addition, when compared to non-ASAP students who earned their associate degrees within six years, ASAP students earned their degrees more quickly.

The following specific findings are detailed in this brief:

Finding #1
ASAP students earned their associate degrees at higher rates than non-ASAP students, even when a longer timeframe was considered.

Finding #2
ASAP students earned their associate degrees more quickly than non-ASAP students within a six-year timeframe.

Finding #3
ASAP students transferred to baccalaureate programs at higher rates than non-ASAP students and earned their bachelor’s degrees at higher rates.

Finding #4
Six years after entering, ASAP students were more likely to have earned undergraduate degrees than non-ASAP students.

Download the full brief: ASAP Graduation Rates by Race/Ethnicity, Gender and Pell Status

Summary

This evaluation brief presents three-year graduation rates for Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) and matched comparison group students by race/ethnicity, gender and Pell status to investigate whether ASAP’s previously demonstrated impact on graduation rates holds across different subgroups of students. Data were analyzed for five ASAP cohorts of students who entered the program from fall 2009 through fall 2012. The findings indicate that all subgroups of students were impacted by ASAP and all subgroups came close to, or exceeded, the 50 percent three-year graduation rate program goal. Additionally, although there were still gaps in three-year graduation rates between subgroups of students within ASAP, the data demonstrate that ASAP may help to narrow existing graduation gaps for black and Hispanic males.

The following specific findings are detailed in this brief:

Finding #1
All subgroups of students within ASAP met or nearly met the 50 percent three-year graduation rate goal.

Finding #2
ASAP had a significant and positive effect on three-year graduation rates for all subgroups.

Finding #3
Within ASAP, white-black and white-Hispanic three-year graduation rate differences were small or nonsignificant, but there were large differences in graduation rates between Asian students and other subgroups.

Finding #4
ASAP appears to have had larger effects on some subgroups of students than others, but results were mixed.