• February 2016 Poll Question

    Q. The deadline to register to vote in the next general election is October 14, 2016. Permanent residents who naturalize after that day can register until what date?

    A. October 17, 2016

    B. November 7, 2016

    C. October 28, 2016

    D. November 8, 2016

    Correct Answer: C. October 28, 2016

    Explanation: For most U.S. citizens living in New York State, the final day to register to vote in the November 2016 general election is October 14th. However, permanent residents that become citizens after that date have until October 28th to register to vote, but they must do so in person at their county Board of Elections office.

    This does not leave our participants with much time to apply! Encourage them to send their application as soon as they can and to register to vote as soon as they go to the swearing-in ceremony. In most cases, applicants who mail their applications for naturalization by the end of May should be able to complete their citizenship process with enough time to register to vote in November.

  • January 2016 Poll Question

    Q. True or False: English is the official national language of the United States.

    1. True
    2. False

    Correct Answer: 2. False

    Explanation: The United States has no official national language. However, USCIS still holds English requirements for naturalization for most applicants. This has been a point of contention for many immigrant advocates.

     

  • December 2015 Case Study

    Q. Which New York City borough has the most foreign-born residents?

    1. The Bronx.
    2. Queens.
    3. Staten Island.
    4. Brooklyn.

    Correct answer: 2. Queens.

    Explanation: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, approximately 48% of Queens residents are foreign-born.

  • November 2015 Case Study

    Q. Every year thousands of immigrants in the United States become eligible to apply for naturalization. Approximately what percentage of eligible immigrants actually become citizens each year?

    1. About 25% of those eligible to naturalize actually become U.S. Citizens.
    2. About 60% of those eligible to naturalize actually become U.S. Citizens.
    3. About 80% of those eligible to naturalize actually become U.S. Citizens.
    4. About 90% of those eligible to naturalize actually become U.S. Citizens.

    Correct answer: 2. About 60% of those eligible to naturalize actually become U.S. Citizens.

    Explanation: According to a recent report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, the United States lags behind other countries on naturalization rates of eligible immigrants. However, the percentage has recently been increasing. In 2002, 50% of eligible immigrants naturalized. The proportion rose to 58% for 2012 (the most recent year for which data is available).

  • October 2015 Case Study

    Q. A participant is exempt from the English language requirement for naturalization if which of the following is true?

    1. If the participant is age 80 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 5 years.
    2. If the participant is age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years.
    3. If the participant is age 50 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 10 years.
    4. If the participant is age 40 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 10 years.

    Correct answer: 2. If the participant is age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years.

    Explanation: A participant is exempt from the English language requirement (but is still required to take the civics test) if the participant is either:
    Age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years (commonly referred to as the “55/15” exception).

    OR

    Age 50 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and has lived as a permanent resident (green card holder) in the United States for 20 years (commonly referred to as the “50/20” exception).