• University URLs: Here’s to Land-Grant Colleges

    February 23, 2018 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai This Sunday’s New York Times included a piece on “vaping” (electronic cigarettes) in which veteran columnist Gina Bellafonte joked that, “among affluent teenagers in and around Manhattan, particularly those in the private school world…insurrection has largely meant coming home from college night and telling your parents that you are thinking about a […]

  • Taking the Measure of Student Fees

    February 16, 2018 | Student Affairs

    By Hugo Fernandez and Emily Tai Last fall, the CUNY Board of Trustees convened a Task Force to examine the structure of Student Activity Fees at the City University of New York.  The rationale for convening this Task Force, which is in the process of reviewing both Article XVI of the CUNY Bylaws (which concern […]

  • Are Your Students Hungry?

    January 22, 2018 | Student Affairs

    by Emily Tai Among the several student-friendly proposals unveiled by Governor Cuomo in his 2018 state-of-the-state speech was the “No Student Goes Hungry,” program, a five-point plan to address food insecurity among public school students in New York State. While four of the provisions are specifically aimed at fighting hunger among K-12 students, the fifth […]

  • Maintaining the Effort for an MOE

    December 14, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai Since 2015, the members of the UFS Executive Committee, the UFS Committee on Student Affairs, and the University Student Senate have worked together to advocate for a state commitment to current or increased levels of state funding for the City University of  New York, or what is known as Maintenance of Effort […]

  • Homeless in College

    September 11, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai Among the many groups of students who struggle for access to higher education in the United States are the 13% students who have been made homeless by the death or arrest of a custodial parent.  Students can also find themselves without a place to live because of factors related to their sexual […]

  • How Quickly Can You Graduate?

    June 9, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai   The strains of “Pomp and Circumstance” bring a close to another academic year — and bad news on economic diversity, which has been in decline at the nation’s top public universities, thanks to diminished funding from state and federal government. David Leonhardt reports on the New York Times College Access Index, which measures economic […]

  • College or Certificates? Education for Students after Prison

    May 17, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai  A recent article in The Wall Street Journal quoted Brooklyn College Professor of Economics, Robert Cherry in arguing for the value of vocational certificate programs for incarcerated students. A 2003 study by the Bureau of Justice statistics found that 68% of the adults incarcerated in state prisons have not completed a high […]

  • Evaluating Excelsior

    April 17, 2017 | Academic Affairs, Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai   Governor Andrew Cuomo’s new Excelsior Scholarship —  specifics in the 2017 New York State Budget — is stirring debate across New York State and the country. Private universities worry about the impact the scholarship will have on their enrollments. Some critics argue that the 30-credit-a-year requirement will exclude part-time students.  They are also concerned by a […]

  • Supporting Part-time Students: UFS Student Affairs Committee Position Paper

    April 12, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Bill Crain, Laroi M. Lawton, and James McElwaine Since 2007, one of every three CUNY students has been enrolled as a part-time student. Part-time students now account for 35.1 percent of those enrolled at CUNY community and senior colleges. In 2013, the Governor and Legislature increased the maximum award under TAP, unchanged since 2001. […]

  • Who Finishes College?

    April 5, 2017 | Student Affairs

    By Emily Tai  Only 1 in 3 Americans hold a college degree.  Although 69.2 % of America’s high school graduates enrolled in college in 2015, only 59% completed a baccalaureate degree within six years. (Third Way found only slightly higher graduation rates at America’s private institutions.) While younger Americans are more likely to enjoy higher levels of […]